Get it on Google Play تحميل تطبيق نبأ للآندرويد مجانا

Nigel Slater’s baked cheese with roasted roots recipe

Life and style | The Guardian

Crusty molten Tunworth or camembert with tender veg

You will need a whole Tunworth or camembert in its thin wooden box. Set the oven at 200C/gas mark 6.

Continue reading...

January 21st 2020, 7:25 am

'Don't assume bulk is best': top tips from savvy shoppers

Life and style | The Guardian

Everybody loves a good deal, but for some, it’s become a lifestyle. Here, we speak to self-professed money ‘experts’ about their go-to strategies for smart spending

For many of us, the big shop is a weekly trundle around the same supermarket, picking up the usual array of items and plonking them in the trolley without too much thought. But Lisa Garwood-Cross, 28, from Bury, has revolutionised her approach to it – by refusing to go more than twice a month and being mindful about what she picks off the shelves.

“Shopping is one of those things you often do on autopilot,” says Garwood-Cross. “But simply switching on to what you need – taking 10 minutes to stocktake what’s in the cupboard before you leave the house – and then really thinking about what you put in the trolley, can save you a lot of money.”

Continue reading...

January 21st 2020, 6:10 am

What does your £10 manicure really cost? The unvarnished truth about nail bars

Life and style | The Guardian

Are vulnerable young Vietnamese people being routinely trafficked into the UK to work in cut-price nail salons? Amelia Gentleman joins a police raid on one shop suspected of involvement in exploitation

Online reviews for this small south-London nail bar are mixed. “Best nail bar in Peckham,” one says. Most comments, however, are more grudging. “Suppose you get what you pay for,” another concludes (customers here do not pay very much, just £10 for a full manicure). Most telling are the comments about the staff. “The younger girls and boys seem to be learning as they go”; “Communication is close to none as they don’t speak English.”

It is this lack of English that is one of the warning flags that has put the shop on a list of nail bars requiring investigation for possible exploitation. On a slow Thursday afternoon, the shabby venue is being raided by 20 police officers; three people are later arrested on human trafficking charges and four frightened young employees are taken temporarily to a council-run reception centre, where they are given medical treatment and advice.

Continue reading...

January 21st 2020, 5:11 am

Clothes fail to match ambition at Christian Dior's Paris show

Life and style | The Guardian

Despite big questions there is little challenging in Maria Grazia Chiuri’s haute couture

“What If Women Ruled the World?” That was the question hanging over Christian Dior’s haute couture show in Paris – literally, in the form of a giant silk embroidered banner above the models’ heads. Twenty one banners punctuated the catwalk, suspended above head height like placards on a protest: “Would Old Women be Revered?”, “Would Buildings Resemble Wombs?” and “Would the Earth be Protected?”

Maria Grazia Chiuri, the creative director of Dior, collaborated with the 80-year-old American feminist artist Judy Chicago for the show. Described as “the godmother of vagina art” Chicago is back in vogue in the era of Gwyneth Paltrow’s vagina-scented candle and Janelle Monáe’s labia trousers.

Continue reading...

January 21st 2020, 4:40 am

Deadly silence: what happens when we don't believe women

Life and style | The Guardian

Not listening to women’s experience of abusive men – and of other areas from health to the economy – harms all of society

It’s become a grim ritual among the women I know: as soon as there is news of another mass shooting, we wait to hear the inevitable story about the shooter’s history of hurting women. (The shooter is always a man.) Sometimes he’s been violent to his mother or grandmother. More often, police reports reveal his history of abusing his girlfriend or wife.

Continue reading...

January 21st 2020, 4:40 am

Should a restaurant charge a customer who cancels because their father died?

Life and style | The Guardian

The case of Martin O’Grady – who was not allowed to reschedule a £660 prepaid meal at the Fordwich Arms – highlights the fine margins of the hospitality industry

Many of us have had to cancel a restaurant booking, but one customer was left with a bitter taste in his mouth after being charged £660 when he pulled out of a New Year’s Eve dinner because his father was fatally injured.

Martin O’Grady wrote on Facebook about his experience with the Michelin-starred Fordwich Arms, near Canterbury. Four days before O’Grady’s reservation, his father was hurt in an accident, so a family member called to ask to move the reservation (O’Grady’s father later died on the day of the booking). They were refused, although Dan Smith, the chef-patron, says the restaurant offered to refund the tickets of O’Grady and his partner, or put the money towards drinks for the rest of the party. They also tried to fill the table from the waiting list. “As a small, independent restaurant in the current financial climate, it is vital we take steps like these to take prepayments to protect our business,” said Smith.

Continue reading...

January 21st 2020, 3:49 am

A sexual dream about my boss has made me very uncomfortable

Life and style | The Guardian

I need advice on how to get over this, as I can’t look at my boss without thinking about it

Recently, I had a sexual dream involving my boss, which has left me very confused and a bit disturbed. I can’t look at my boss without thinking about it and it’s very uncomfortable. I was wondering if you have any advice on how to forget this or how to get over it?

You do not need to feel uncomfortable at work because your dream was not about your boss. When we dream about people we know, they are symbols – representations of something or someone. Ask yourself: “What does my boss represent to me?” For example, if they represent authority, then the dream could mean you are “flirting” with a need to take charge of your life more effectively.

Continue reading...

January 21st 2020, 3:49 am

From vagina eggs to anti-vaxxers: is it time for an influencer detox?

Life and style | The Guardian

Scepticism can be healthy – especially when celebrities are pushing debunked nonsense

For purveyors of snake oil, January is an especially lucrative month. Fresh from our festive excesses, our bodily insecurities are readily exploited by those looking to make a quick buck from a worthless ware. This month has already seen the unedifying sight of a Kardashian pushing a “flat-tummy” shake to her 27.7 million Twitter followers, while Netflix has abandoned any pretension of quality-control by allowing the actor Gwyneth Paltrow her own show, effectively a glorified promotional vehicle for Paltrow’s lifestyle brand Goop.

For those so inclined, Paltrow sells all manner of pseudoscientific regimes, from “jade eggs” (essentially rocks that Paltrow recommends women carry in their vagina, despite gynaecologists imploring people not to do this) to “healing stickers” to a $75 candle that ostensibly smells of Paltrow’s vagina. Sadly, neither repeated admonishment by scientists and doctors nor a lawsuit against Goop for medically unsupported claims have done anything to impede their popularity, and the candles have already sold out, as did the jade eggs before them.

Continue reading...

January 21st 2020, 2:19 am

'Marriage Story was stunningly on-point': what divorce lawyers want you to know

Life and style | The Guardian

If you have gone from hoping that your marriage will last for ever to hoping that it will all be over cheaply and painlessly, the experts have some bad news

There is a moment early on in the film Marriage Story, Noah Baumbach’s Oscar-nominated exploration of divorce, that sparked rueful recognition from Tom Kretchmar, a divorce lawyer. “Right at the outset, the actors Adam Driver and Scarlett Johansson are like: ‘What’s there to fight about? This is going to be easy – we’ll take half each and go our separate ways.’”

The naivety of that assumption is revealed after the couple lawyer up. They eventually find themselves in a courtroom, side by side but never further apart, wondering what had happened to their amicable split. Thought to be inspired by Baumbach’s split from Jennifer Jason Leigh in 2013, the film has won widespread acclaim for its depiction of the end of a marriage.

Continue reading...

January 20th 2020, 10:24 am

Rachel Roddy's recipe for lamb ragu with pasta | A Kitchen in Rome

Life and style | The Guardian

A visit to the butcher is a reminder that meat should be a privilege, not an everyday convenience, and should be cherished in time-honoured dishes like this Roman-inspired lamb ragu with pasta

As my butcher bones out a leg of lamb and cuts the meat into pieces with a precise “thwack thwack”, or joints a chicken, we talk. About the lamb or chicken; how old it is and where it came from; the nature of the cut and the goodness of fat. We talk about what I plan to do with whatever I have bought when I get home. She is generous with advice when I ask for it, in that moment shifting roles from butcher to the sort of confident home cook who inspires trust. We also talk about being the mums of difficult eight-year-old boys, and swing between big headlines and the minutiae of every day: dry hands and cold mornings.

Manuela’s hands are worth watching: like her brother, mother and grandmother before her, she is incredibly skilled, with the strength of a lumberjack and the precision of a surgeon. The other day she cut a gallina (boiling fowl) in half to reveal eggs; one almost at full size in its opaque sack, the rest a bunch, like tiny grapes, only bright yellow. It was a shock, to be honest; I wanted to turn away. It was Manuela’s reaction that made me turn back, her practical admiration of the animal before her and then the way she carefully cut away the cluster of eggs and lifted them into a tub and told me to poach them in the broth I was about to make. Again, I was shocked by her suggestion; the familiar comfort of my morning shop and cooking plans disturbed by the reality of the meat I chose to eat.

Continue reading...

January 20th 2020, 9:24 am

Thomasina Miers’ recipe for vegatarian chilli with roasted squash and black beans | The Simple Fix

Life and style | The Guardian

A substantial chilli brimming with character and spice, and full of satisfying texture

Towards the end of last year, a reader wrote in to request a chilli recipe for vegetarians. I thought it would be rather fitting for January, when there is a push to eat less meat, but most of us still need rich, comforting food to get through the cold evenings. Using different root vegetables builds layers of flavour in the chilli, so you might like to try carrots, parsnips and other roots, too.

Continue reading...

January 20th 2020, 8:39 am

Set goals, switch off social and snack well: how to be more productive at work

Life and style | The Guardian

With businesses set to gain an extra 18 days a year thanks to improved connectivity, Joy Persaud reminds us how individually we can make small changes to find even more productivity gains at work

Time is the precious commodity we all want more of. That elusive 25th hour of the day or the eighth day of the week always seems to escape us. But what if there were a way to regain some time? According to O2 Business, workers could gain a valuable 3.14 hours a week – nearly 18 working days a year – thanks to improved connectivity.

In fact, enhanced connectivity could provide UK businesses with a £34.1bn productivity bonus, with the retail sector alone enjoying a potential annual boost of £4.9bn.

Continue reading...

January 20th 2020, 7:21 am

How we met: ‘When my wife was dying, she told me to look up my old friend DeeDee’

Life and style | The Guardian

Twice-widowed Bob McLaren first met his partner DeeDee Zweibel when they were in their 20s. They reunited four decades later ...

When Bob McLaren was offered the chance to join a cruise ship band at the end of 1973, he wasn’t expecting more than a few months of fun. “I’d performed on several ships before,” he explains. “I had no plans to go again but then my agent offered me a great gig that I couldn’t turn down.”

In January 1974, the ship docked in Los Angeles, where it picked up DeeDee Zweibel. “I was working as a dancer,” she says. “I was part of a double act with a magician.” Bob, meanwhile, was playing bass guitar and double bass. As soon as he spotted her on stage, sparks began to fly.

Continue reading...

January 20th 2020, 7:21 am

Slip, slop, what? Why putting on sunscreen suddenly seems complicated

Life and style | The Guardian

Despite concerns over reef health, vitamin D deficiencies and multi-layered skincare routines, tried and tested sunscreen advice holds true

Advice about sunscreen used to be simple: just wear it. Beyond that, all you needed to know was the higher the SPF the better. We went on like that for decades. The only real divide being whether you were for or against coconut scent.

But in recent years, new schools of thought have fractured the status-sunscreen-quo. Twenty-first century sunscreen savants are mulling over formula, producer, recipe, country of origin and impact on the environment.

Continue reading...

January 20th 2020, 5:53 am

How to be a good listener: my mission to learn the most important skill of all

Life and style | The Guardian

The author Kate Murphy thinks our inability to listen properly to other people is leaving us all feeling isolated. In a world of smartphones and busy schedules, can we re-engage?

I was very suspicious about this assignment. Kate Murphy’s new book, You’re Not Listening, suggests that many of us – absorbed in our own thoughts and dreams, occupying our little digital bubbles – have lost the ability to listen, creating an epidemic of loneliness and isolation. The thesis seems inherently plausible – but why me? Are you trying to tell me something about my inability, or perhaps unwillingness, to listen?

As my editor started telling me how I might approach this piece, I began – much to the amusement of our colleagues – interrupting her. OK, maybe I do have a little problem shutting up for a few minutes to listen; a tendency to anticipate what the other person is going to say and reply before they have even had the chance to express it the way they want to. “Bad listeners are not necessarily bad people,” Murphy says in her book, but being unable or unwilling to listen is not an attractive characteristic. It’s time for a spot of re-education. Let’s hope that after a life of lecturing rather than listening, it’s not too late.

Continue reading...

January 20th 2020, 4:06 am

Nadia Whittome, Britain’s youngest MP, on race, Rees-Mogg – and taking a massive pay cut

Life and style | The Guardian

The 23-year-old Labour member for Nottingham East still lives at home – and, despite the steep learning curve, she is determined to shake up parliament

When Nadia Whittome was growing up, her mother told her that, as a working-class girl of colour, she had to be twice as good as others to be judged half as good. Evidently, it was a lesson that the youngest MP to enter parliament at after last month’s general election took to heart. After all, not every 23-year-old’s nights out clubbing end with them trying diligently to unionise the staff. “Sometimes in the club toilets there are women selling deodorants or sweets. And I’ll go up to them and have a chat and just get to know them and ask whether they’re in a union,” explains the new Labour MP for Nottingham East, grinning. “My friends are always like: ‘Nadia, we’re going to get the shots in ...’ But politics is life, isn’t it? We live it every day.”

She is living it very differently these days, however. Almost overnight, Whittome went from living at home with her mum in Nottingham to representing her city in parliament and being grilled on the Today programme. Her election victory was a light on an otherwise dark night for the radical left. But it is a lot to take in for someone selected only 24 hours before the election was called and who had never lived away from home before she was elected (although she now has a flat in London for weeknights, she is still under her mother’s roof in her constituency). “People keep asking me how I feel, and the truth is there’s no time to process how I feel. I’m just getting on with the job,” she says. “It does feel really odd that, not very long ago, I was looking for Christmas temp work – got rejected from a lot of Christmas temp work – and now I’m a member of parliament.”

Continue reading...

January 20th 2020, 4:06 am

Five recipes for a Chinese new year feast

Life and style | The Guardian

Celebrate China’s lunar new year with classic and updated dishes, including dongpo pork, stir-fried okra and braised fish with chillies

The diversity of Chinese cuisines is extraordinary but one food ritual unites Han Chinese communities all over the country and the world: the lunar New Year’s Eve dinner. (This year’s Chinese new year is on 25 January.) It’s the time when families traditionally gather for a lavish feast, prefaced by ritual offerings to gods and ancestors, and followed at midnight by a storm of firecrackers.

There are few rules for this “family reunion” (tuannian) meal except that there should be extraordinary amounts of food, particularly fish, meat and poultry (dayu darou: “great fish and great meat”). In the countryside, many households still fatten a pig as the holiday approaches, eating the prime cuts over the festivities, then making bacon, sausages or confit pork to eke out over the months ahead. The other essential is a fish, served whole and never quite finished, because the phrase “a fish every year” (niannian youyu) sounds the same in Chinese as “every year a surplus”.

Continue reading...

January 20th 2020, 4:06 am

Paul Smith closes Paris fashion week in party mood

Life and style | The Guardian

British design label celebrates 50th anniversary with modern twists in nostalgic collection

The British design legend Sir Paul Smith closed Paris fashion week with a nostalgic collection that featured an award-show-worthy front row: Susan Sarandon, Bill Nighy, Jimmy Page, Sir Ian McKellen, Anna Wintour and Jon Hamm (who was wearing trademark Smith socks).

There was a party mood as the label, known for its signature multicoloured stripes, celebrated its 50th anniversary on Sunday night. The show had a victory-lap feeling, riffing on Smith’s rich history of mixing Savile Row traditions with modernist masculine silhouettes.

Continue reading...

January 20th 2020, 3:21 am

I suppressed the pain of my mother's death for decades. Then I found a way to grieve

Life and style | The Guardian

My mother died when I was seven and I thought sadness was just a part of me. But music offered the perfect release

I lost my mum to cancer when I was seven. My parents were already divorced and I was living with my mother in Cambridgeshire. When she died, I moved up to Scotland to my dad’s, leaving behind a whole world. But I never properly grieved.

Before Mum died, I remember my childhood idyllically. It was a rural upbringing filled with dogs, the outdoors, protection and love. I had many enthusiastic interests, from pirate ships and trains, to Lego and the guitar. I was popular at school and quite daring once I got over my initial shyness.

Continue reading...

January 20th 2020, 2:06 am

How to maintain healthy cholesterol levels

Life and style | The Guardian

Regular testing will spot if you have high cholesterol, but it’s best to make early changes to your lifestyle to minimise the risk of a heart attack or stroke

The first challenge is pursuading people to get their cholesterol tested. The second is making sure they get it done by a healthcare professional, whether that is with a GP or a practice nurse, or at an NHS Health Check. Some pharmacies and supermarkets are starting to offer tests, and there are local initiatives, too.

Symptoms of high cholesterol show only when you are starting to get heart disease as a result: you build up a lot of fatty plaque in your arteries, start to experience shortness of breath, chest pains or angina. By that point, the condition is irreversible – and the earlier in life you have a heart attack or stroke, the worse your long-term outcomes are. Prevention is absolutely better than cure.

Continue reading...

January 19th 2020, 11:37 am

Stay in bed or struggle in? How to know when to go back to work after an illness

Life and style | The Guardian

If you come into the office with a cold or a bug, your boss may be happy, but your co-workers won’t thank you. GPs offer their advice on when to heal at home or return to the office

We have all known colleagues who struggle into work when they are unwell, leaving a trail of germs that threaten the health of their co-workers – and then expect praise for their fortitude. Maybe you are one of them. So, should you do the decent thing and go home?

According to the Office for National Statistics, 141m working days were lost in 2018, with minor illnesses such as colds the most common reason for absence. Although the days lost to sickness have been falling since the early 00s, with a sharp dip since the 2008 recession, the reason is probably not that we are getting healthier, but that we are more worried about job security. Presenteeism has tripled to a record high since 2010, according to a survey by the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development in 2018.

Continue reading...

January 19th 2020, 9:33 am

Try a novella and ditch your snobbery: five ways to read more books

Life and style | The Guardian

Reading is good for the brain and the soul, but we don’t always find the time, the inclination – or the right book. That can be easily changed

Struggling to find the time to read could suggest you are reading the wrong books. Sian Cain, the Guardian’s books site editor, says people often aspire to read books they feel they “should”, rather than ones they actually want to read, then end up putting them off. “Get over your snobbery, as there is literally a book for everyone out there.” John Rampton, an entrepreneur who has written about building a voracious reading habit, adds: “If I go for one or two books that are just OK, my rhythm gets thrown off.”

Continue reading...

January 19th 2020, 8:33 am

20 of the UK's best restaurants – as chosen by Britain’s top chefs

Life and style | The Guardian

Secret gems and neighbourhood hideaways where chefs love to eat: from a cafe lunch in Cornwall to a tasting menu on the Scottish coast

Silk Road, London SE5
Chosen by James Cochran, chef-owner, Restaurant 1251

I’ve lived in south London for 15 years and the neighbourhood restaurant that stands out is Silk Road in Camberwell. I’m a massive fan of their Xinjiang style of Chinese cooking and they do many unusual things that you don’t normally see in Chinese restaurants in this country. I associate kebabs with Turkish or Greek food, but here they do lamb skewers which they cover in delicious Asian spices and chargrill really quickly. Their dumplings are on point as well. In fact, everything is packed full of flavour, but nicely balanced. The restaurant is very minimalistic, drinks are BYO and the food is very affordable – spend £20 and you’re full.

Continue reading...

January 19th 2020, 7:21 am

Comme des Garçons in row over 'white models in cornrow wigs'

Life and style | The Guardian

Fashion house accused of cultural appropriation over wigs used in men’s show

The fashion house Comme des Garçons has been accused of cultural appropriation after white models sported what appeared to be black hair wigs during its men’s fall/winter 2020 show.

In a post on Instagram, the industry watchdog Diet Prada said the label had put “white models in cornrow wigs”.

Continue reading...

January 19th 2020, 7:21 am

If you are confronting a midlife crisis, put up a fight – and take up boxing

Life and style | The Guardian

At 50, I knew I was trapped in a gentle, terminal decline. But when I stumbled on boxing, I found the challenge I needed

Modern life has made us all so ill that we have been compelled to invent its polar opposite, “wellness”. It is not enough just to be well, there is an additional demand to be seen to be well. Wellness is complicated and needs time, money and access to special food, travel and social media. By chance in middle age, I discovered a cheaper, simpler and more enjoyable alternative: I took up boxing.

Boxing is cheap, unpretentious, sociable and has transformative powers. On the outside I am an ordinary 56-year-old woman, but on the inside, after six years’ boxing training, I have surpassed notions of “wellness”. I can also skip for England and throw a great jab.

Continue reading...

January 19th 2020, 6:29 am

Wine o'clock: the ultimate tour of the Cape Winelands

Life and style | The Guardian

An easy drive from Cape Town, the Cape Winelands is home to some of the most prestigious wineries on Earth, as well as world-class hikes, museums, art galleries and boutique hotels. Here’s how to spend your grape escape …

After you’ve touched down in Cape Town, marvelled at Table Mountain, basked on the beaches and made a visit to Robben Island, it’s time to sip your way around the Cape Winelands. The jagged mountains around Stellenbosch and Franschhoek make ideal Mediterranean-like microclimates for vines, but there’s more to this area than just sampling the pinotage. The best way to take it all in? Fly direct with British Airways, pick up a hire car from Avis and hit the open road, pitstopping at the region’s boutique hotels so you can take time to savour the local history and scenery. And the wine. Let’s not forget the wine.

Continue reading...

January 19th 2020, 6:16 am

When Nigel Slater met Nadiya Hussain

Life and style | The Guardian

Over curry and cake, two of the UK’s best-loved food writers talk about family, anxiety and learning to cope with life in the public eye

It is almost lunchtime when Nadiya Hussain arrives at my front door. She is bearing gifts. Among them, a tin of pastries she had fried that morning. “They’re my mum’s favourite,” she adds, handing me a tin of flaky, parcels, laminated like a cronut, each layer dusted with icing sugar and freckled with black onion seeds. We debate whether they are savoury or sweet. (The answer is both.) Two are wolfed instantly without the tea and clotted cream she insists they need and the rest are squirrelled away for tomorrow’s breakfast, but only because we are about to tuck into lunch.

Even before she reached the final of The Great British Bake Off, Nadiya was known to television viewers by a single name, like Nigella or Jamie. What fans of the programme like myself couldn’t know, as we took this quietly confident contestant to our hearts, was that between takes, she was running off to cry in the loo, shaking with nerves and unsure about how this could ever have happened to her.

Continue reading...

January 19th 2020, 6:16 am

Now Boris Johnson has really turned politics into a puppet show | Stewart Lee

Life and style | The Guardian

A cloth rabbit more than held its own with the prime minister on the BBC

My metropolitan liberal elitist friends here in 78.5% Remain-voting Hackney do not hold BBC news in high regard, its election coverage considered biased in favour of the government and Laura Kuenssberg merely a horrid flesh trombone through which Dominic Cumming honks his reverberating falsehoods.

The news seemed skewed. During the election, the prime minister declined the grilling Andrew “Weetabix” Neil gave his opponents, had a selfie with an impartial Phillip Schofield on ITV and hid in a variety of white goods whenever regional reporters tried to ask basic questions, such as how many children he had or what he actually meant by any of the things he had said.

Continue reading...

January 19th 2020, 5:29 am

Confessions of an accidental influencer

Life and style | The Guardian

When Bella Mackie began posting about her struggles with anxiety, she unexpectedly found herself becoming an influencer. But what did sharing her private fears teach her?

“Bella, I know it’s not the point, but where is your jumper from?” This was a reply to a post I put up on Instagram about the horrors of antidepressant withdrawal. I respond with the details, mildly flattered, but slightly despairing. After decades of not talking about my mental health issues, I started an Instagram account (@mackie_bella) hoping to talk more honestly about them, but maybe when everyone has their own struggles they don’t want to be burdened with yours. Why would you want to watch someone else moan on the morning commute when you could gaze at a lovely fluffy jumper to cheer yourself up? I would choose the jumper myself most days.

I have become somewhat well followed on Instagram at a time when the platform is being hugely criticised. Social media influencers are widely scorned for showing off unattainable lifestyles, promoting irresponsible products, such as slimming teas, and being disingenuous about what’s real and what’s staged for effect. Websites have sprung up where those who are fed up with the polished images can call them out, sometimes brutally.

Continue reading...

January 19th 2020, 5:29 am

I eat only strangers' leftover food – and it's the best diet I've ever had

Life and style | The Guardian

To try to combat the mountain of food waste, diabetic Andrew Mayers decided to live on what people chuck in the bin. Even if it’s two doughnuts and a cucumber

My NHS dietician says that January is a dangerous month for diabetics such as me. The shops are full of Christmas leftovers: those high-calorie, nutrient-light foodstuffs, now for sale at massive discounts – confectionery collections, deep-filled mince pies, presentation tins of chocolate biscuits. You exert all that willpower over the festive period, and just when you think it’s safe to go back into the supermarkets …

But in the last year I’ve pretty much stopped going into supermarkets. Or takeaways. Or fast-food joints. Not that I’ve stopped eating their products – I’ve restricted myself to hoovering up what other people bring on to the streets and squander: my own personal Deliveroo, free of charge.

Continue reading...

January 19th 2020, 4:29 am

I fancy both boys and girls, but don’t know what that makes me | Dear Mariella

Life and style | The Guardian

Our once-binary world is loosening its shackles, says Mariella Frostrup. Be inquisitive but don’t feel pressured to define yourself yet

The dilemma I’m a 16-year-old girl and in need of advice concerning sexuality. I’ve only been questioning it since I was 15, and I frantically search the internet for answers all the time, even though I know it’s not that simple (especially for someone as young as me who has had little experience with relationships). For a while I’ve settled on the term “bisexual”, because I know I’m not straight, but even that doesn’t feel right. I’m physically attracted to boys, but I’ve only had one real crush and that was four years ago. I’m definitely physically attracted to girls, too, although some days I’m not into it as much, and other days I’ll be all for it. This might lead you to think that bisexual is a good label for me to stick with, but I’ve never had a proper crush on a girl, and I don’t know if I could be romantically attracted. I know it sounds pretty silly and that I have time to figure out who I am and what I like, but I’m anxious all the time over it.

Mariella replies Thanks for writing. I’m sorry, but not surprised, to hear that you’re feeling confused. As our once-binary world loosens its shackles on our sexuality it sometimes seems to be piling up almost as much pressure as it relieves. With so many choices and tribes to consider, it must be positively baffling to be a teenager awakening to the myriad paths before you. I’m not suggesting we revert to the landscape of my teenage years when, as a girl, even admitting to sexual desire marked you down as a bad ’un, but with so many options, how are you to make your selection? And how much do you want to get bogged down in the “research”?

Continue reading...

January 19th 2020, 4:15 am

How to make the world happier – and why it should be our first priority

Life and style | The Guardian

In this extract from his new book, the UK’s happiness tsar argues for wellbeing as a political goal as well as a personal one

• Read our interview with Richard Layard

Whoever is happy will make others happy too... How wonderful it is that nobody need wait a single moment before starting to improve the world.
Anne Frank, The Diary of a Young Girl

There is a wind of change in our society. People are talking about feelings. Even men are doing it. Relatively recently Prince William and Prince Harry talked for the first time about their mother’s death and how it affected their own mental health. All around there is a new undercurrent – a greater concern with our own inner life and with how other people feel. A new, gentler culture is emerging.

Continue reading...

January 19th 2020, 4:15 am

My old pub has banned mobiles. I cherish the return of tranquility

Life and style | The Guardian

A world of hushed conversations by a good fire is back at a Sam Smith local in Knaresborough

It was during the pouring of my first pint that I began to realise that at the Commercial Hotel in Knaresborough they do things a little differently. Standing at the bar, I was briefly texting my whereabouts to a friend. “You’ll have to put that phone away,” the barman told me. “This is a digital detox pub.”

I had seen the signs. It was hard to miss them since they were on every wall. Every beer mat carried the same message, an image of a digital device and a “no-entry” sign. I had not, however, bargained on such draconian enforcement of the rules. Having gone outside to complete the text, I came back and produced my bank card to pay for the lager. The barman pointed to another sign. “We don’t take cards, only cash. If you go up the high street, you can find a cashpoint.” As I left for a second time to get some money, I thought I caught the trace of a smirk on a fellow drinker’s face as they gazed impassively into the middle distance.

Continue reading...

January 19th 2020, 4:15 am

I thought I had hit the age of peak happiness. How wrong I was

Life and style | The Guardian

As a study shows 47.2 is the height of misery, what is the economic theory and psychology of wellbeing – and does it offer a brighter tomorrow

So,” I say to my wife, “I’ve been asked to write about happiness peaking when we hit 47.2 years of age.” She stares at me like she’s waiting for a punchline, then shakes her head. “Because I’m about to hit 47.2,” I say, in case she had forgotten that we recently celebrated my 47th birthday. “A team of economists have worked it out.”

There is an uncomfortable pause. My wife shakes her head again and says gently: “No, 47.2 is when you hit peak misery. It’s been all over the papers. Have you not been reading them? I was going to send you the links but I didn’t want you to have some sort of meltdown.”

Continue reading...

January 19th 2020, 4:15 am

Merienda, Edinburgh: ‘Good in parts’ – restaurant review

Life and style | The Guardian

Some of the small plates here are lovely, others merely baffling

Merienda, 30 North West Circus Place, Edinburgh EH3 6TP (0103 220 2020). All savoury dishes £5.90-£9.50, desserts £7, wines from £26

There is a strain within postwar modern sculpture that, like the male ego, is dependent for its impact on enlargement. The small and banal is rendered otherworldly and apparently interesting simply by dint of having been expanded to something far beyond the expected. Think Jeff Koons’s shiny, polished balloon animals, inflated to elephantine size, or the 70m-long pink knitted rabbit, seemingly dropped on to a hillside by the Austrian art collective Gelitin, as if the discarded toy of some unimaginably giant child.

Continue reading...

January 19th 2020, 4:15 am

Stay in vogue with the new rogue eyeliners

Life and style | The Guardian

Dare to take an unconventional approach to your makeup

It’s time to go rogue with your eyeliner. Many SS20 catwalks (like Victoria Beckham, Courreges, Mugler and, as seen here, Matty Bovan) showed models walking down the runway with lines drawn across and around eyes and brows in a way that was totally unexpected. You’ll need an eye primer (it creates a great canvas) and a steady hand (stretch the skin taut as you draw). And if you are wondering why on earth you’d try this look just remember: it’s a consistently conventional approach to makeup that causes premature ageing, not fine lines.

1. Charlotte Tilbury Pillow Talk Eyeliner £19, charlottetilbury.com
2. MAC Extra Dimension Eyeshadow in Evening Grey £16.50, maccosmetics.co.uk
3. Glossier Colorslide Gel Eyeliner £13, glossier.com
4. Victoria Beckham Satin Kajal EyeLiner £20, victoriabeckham.com
5. MAC Eye Kohl in Prunella £15, maccosmetics.co.uk

Continue reading...

January 19th 2020, 1:41 am

Ben Gorham: ‘With Byredo I wanted a more inclusive approach to luxury’

Life and style | The Guardian

After his career as a basketballer ended, Ben Gorham leapt into a whole new world – and set up the luxury brand Byredo

He has shops on the coolest streets of New York, Paris, London and Seoul, with two Beijing flagships having opened last year. He’s good mates with Louis Vuitton’s Virgil Abloh, Burberry’s Riccardo Tisci and Kanye West, and has Naomi Campbell and Edward Enninful RSVPing to his launch parties around the world. But Ben Gorham still might be one of the most influential people you’ve never heard of.

You are, however, likely to be familiar with his brainchild, Byredo. The brand is, after all, largely responsible for the reason you may have coveted a designer candle or boutique perfume in the last decade. Since its launch as a fragrance brand in 2006, it has become a byword for independent cool, with multiple new categories – including handbags, eyewear, trainers, men’s tailoring and, most recently, jewellery – taking it from modest to major player.

Continue reading...

January 18th 2020, 12:17 pm

Blooming on Instagram ... why Gen Z has taken to flower arranging

Life and style | The Guardian

Classes sold out at new breed of florists

Once upon a time flower arranging was the preserve of the 1950s housewife accessorising the kitchen table, perhaps with help from doughty members of the Women’s Institute. Now, floristry is attracting a younger, cooler crowd out to impress their Instagram followers.

The owners of Sage, a flower shop in Peckham, south London, that hosts monthly bouquet and vase arranging classes, have seen a huge increase in interest from young people since they opened. “It’s young people in their mid-20s to mid-30s that are coming. It’s super popular and they’re fully booked,” says the 25-year-old co-founder, Iona Mathieson.

Continue reading...

January 18th 2020, 12:03 pm

Gwyneth Paltrow has capitalized on vaginal shame and celebration | Arwa Mahdawi

Life and style | The Guardian

Why are vaginas suddenly everywhere? Partly because of the rise of ‘wellness’ – but also because they’re now a symbol of resistance

Sign up for the Week in Patriarchy, a newsletter​ on feminism and sexism sent every Saturday.

Continue reading...

January 18th 2020, 9:14 am

Electric vehicles: Can they make drivers happier, calmer and less stressed?

Life and style | The Guardian

EVs mean cleaner cities, but could they improve the experience for drivers too? One ground-breaking partnership piloted by Audi and Addison Lee Group uncovered some surprising benefits to going electric

For companies that rely on fleet vehicles, change is inevitable. A raft of green policies have introduced zero-emissions targets, along with financial incentives encouraging businesses to adopt cleaner cars and vans, such as no vehicle tax for electric company cars in 2020/21.

However, as well as helping the planet and improving a company’s bottom line, the “greening” of vehicle fleets by going fully electric could bring additional benefits. A recent widely reported study found that jumping behind the wheel of an electric car – rather than a traditional petrol or diesel – could also make drivers happier, calmer and less stressed too.

Continue reading...

January 18th 2020, 7:30 am

Fit in my 40s: does military fitness work without the person shouting at you?

Life and style | The Guardian

If there’s one thing I like less than being told what to do, it’s being told what to do in a loud voice

• Fitness tips: three easy ways to get military fit

For the next few weeks, all the exercises featured here will be free. I’m trolling you, really: being skint is the best-known reason for delaying a health kick, and January is skintness’s playground. Not any more.

If there’s one thing I like less than being told what to do, it’s being told what to do in a loud voice. I believe my historic antipathy to most of fitness stems from a hatred of authority, and British Military Fitness was never, in consequence, my thing. But what if you can weaponise yourself? That’s the proposition made by Major Sam McGrath in his book Be Para Fit: The 4-week Formula For Elite Physical Fitness. I found many of his principles inherently implausible. “When you’re at your lowest ebb and everything is spent, there’s always at least 20% left in the tank”, for instance.

Continue reading...

January 18th 2020, 7:09 am

I ‘miscarried’ a child 20 years ago, and I know the language we use really matters | Shelley Silas

Life and style | The Guardian

Women’s traumatic experiences are made light of with weird, evasive language. No wonder so many end up with PTSD

It was the day before my nephew’s barmitzvah, almost 20 years ago, when family and friends would gather to celebrate my sister’s son’s coming of age. After nine years, my parents had just accepted my wife into the family: this was going to be an important moment for us as a couple. But it wasn’t the happy event I’d hoped for.

My wife and I had already told my parents – and others – that we were pregnant. I wanted a boy, and we knew his name: Eli. That day before the barmitzvah, I was due to have the all-important first scan where a heartbeat would be detected – but when I woke that morning I knew something was wrong.

Continue reading...

January 18th 2020, 5:39 am

I’ve fallen for basketball, but my hoop dreams are turning into a nightmare | Romesh Ranganathan

Life and style | The Guardian

With 1,200 games per season, I’ve got serious commitment issues with this new relationship

I have fallen in love with the NBA. Just before the new year, as part of a series I am filming, I watched a game of basketball and enjoyed it more than almost any other sporting event I have attended. This was a huge surprise. I have always been cynical about Brits who like American sports; hipsters prancing about in their Chicago Bulls vests and trying to recreate White Men Can’t Jump in Burgess Hill. But now I think they might be right.

I still love football, of course. All of the things I love in life I have loved for the longest time: hip-hop, Arsenal, comic books, gaming, breakfast cereal, leaving phone chargers in hotels. But this is the first time in years that I have got into something new. I had assumed that my interests were now ring-fenced, like my friendship group. To become friends with anyone new at this stage, we would have to have a connection better than the one I have with my wife. In all honesty, I’m much more in the market to cull some of my current ones.

Continue reading...

January 18th 2020, 5:09 am

Tim Dowling: it’s day two of the silent treatment. Can I keep it up?

Life and style | The Guardian

I stopped talking to my wife when she told me she’d thrown out my drawing board

I am not speaking to my wife, although I concede she has no real way of knowing this. I’m in my office shed, working and not speaking to her, and she’s inside, oblivious.

I have not been speaking to her since she paid someone to come and take away the junk stacked under the covered bit of our side return: an old shelving unit, a couple of redundant light fittings, a broken chair, a dismantled pallet and my drawing board.

Continue reading...

January 18th 2020, 5:09 am

‘She said she’d be babysitting our embryo’: what’s it like to carry a child for a friend?

Life and style | The Guardian

Surrogacy between friends can be life-changing. The people who have done it talk emotions, legal hurdles – and WhatsApp birthing groups

In a flat in north-east London, Abi is cradling her best friend’s baby. At 15 weeks old, the little boy is smiling up at her, testing out his first sounds. His mother, Rachel, prepares his bottle while Abi rocks him, showing all the love she would to any of her friends’ children. The only difference is that Abi gave birth to him.

Abi and Rachel, both 35, met on their first day at university in Birmingham in 2003 and rarely left one another’s side. At 16, Rachel had been diagnosed with MRKH, a congenital condition meaning her uterus was undeveloped. Although she produced eggs, she would never be able to carry children, something she kept to herself. “I’d tell people I didn’t want kids but deep down I was insanely jealous,” says Rachel, who works as an events producer in London. “I wanted them so badly but assumed I’d never have my own, so I learned to live with it.”

Continue reading...

January 18th 2020, 4:56 am

I should love Little Women. But sometimes it’s hard to fall in love with the perfect match | Hadley

Life and style | The Guardian

The novel was one of my favourites as a child. If I don’t like Greta Gerwig’s film, who even am I?

Nora Ephron famously felt bad about her neck. I don’t feel bad about my neck, not yet. Instead, I feel bad about Little Women.

The reviews of Greta Gerwig’s film adaptation have been universally adoring. “Superb,” said Empire. “One-hundred-and-fifty-year-old literature never felt so alive,” agreed The Observer. Liking the film is now considered as much a part of being a thoughtful modern woman as supporting Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. Because this movie isn’t just good, people wrote with urgency on social media – it’s important. It’s about women and creativity and it stars women – four of them! It’s an adaptation of one of the greatest women’s novels, done by Gerwig, who, like Phoebe Waller-Bridge, was decreed by The Council of General Consensus to be An Excellent Thing. As Marmee says in the book, “I never can wish you a greater happiness than this!”

Continue reading...

January 18th 2020, 4:26 am

‘One 80s pop star buys stink bombs’: inside Britain’s struggling joke shops

Life and style | The Guardian

They have tickled the British for decades. So why are fake poo peddlers finding it harder to raise a smile?

I can only blame myself for my parents’ career as unwitting joke shop owners. As a child, I was preoccupied with Monty Python, and longed for a rubber chicken. I had never seen one in real life, but had a sense that it would bring boundless comedic joy.

At the time, my parents already ran a retail business, and their search for a chicken led them to Ray Peckett, the owner of the UK’s largest joke and costume wholesalers, Smiffys. As family legend has it, Ray would only sell them one if they promised to open a joke shop. So they did.

Continue reading...

January 18th 2020, 4:26 am

‘All that is good in human nature is here’: life and death in an NHS hospice

Life and style | The Guardian

Is there a good way to approach the end of life? Rachel Clarke, a palliative care doctor, believes there is – and that we can all learn from her patients

She’s called Gemma. She’s three years old. She fell into a canal,” said a senior nurse. “By the time her parents managed to get her out, apparently she’d already stopped breathing.” “Paramedics three minutes away,” called another nurse, holding the scarlet phone on which emergencies were called through. With a grace and efficiency akin to choreography, a team of professionals who moments beforehand had been as disparate as atoms, dispersed across the hospital, were poised around an empty resuscitation bed, waiting as one to swing into action.

The consultant quietly confirmed each team member’s role. The anaesthetist, responsible for airway. The scribe, who would note down, in meticulous detail, the timings, the drugs, the doses, every iota of care which, if we were lucky, might snatch life back from lifelessness. Doctor one, doctor two – the roles and responsibilities went on. Then, a moment of silence before the paramedics’ brute force pushed a trolley through the swing doors and there, tiny, limp and pale, lay a toddler, unmoving beneath the harsh fluorescent lights.

Continue reading...

January 18th 2020, 4:26 am

‘We keep him close, always’: how I survived the loss of my teenage son

Life and style | The Guardian

Seven years ago, my 14-year-old son, Kadian, was killed in a road accident. This is the advice I’d give myself back then

When I was asked recently to speak about my “grief journey” to a group of bereaved parents, my first reaction was that it wasn’t such a good idea. I was very worried that it would trigger something in me. Because seven years ago, I watched my 14-year-old son Kadian ride down a hill on a bicycle, and into a road where he was struck by a truck. He died in front of me.

I was also anxious about making generalisations – after all, everyone’s experience is different. There is no blueprint or boilerplate for how to cope with such a calamity. I didn’t want to cause anyone additional pain.

Continue reading...

January 18th 2020, 4:26 am

Blind date: ‘She was willing to call time straight after dessert’

Life and style | The Guardian

Alex, 29, accountant, meets Charlotte, 27, teacher

What were you hoping for?
Someone to go dancing in the moonlight with.

Continue reading...

January 18th 2020, 4:26 am

Nailbiter to keen runner: the three secrets to turning a bad habit into a good one

Life and style | The Guardian

From looking at my phone too much to sucking air through my teeth and biting my nails, I have habits I’d like to change. Can a treadmill desk and cookery lessons with my girlfriend help?

I am going to talk to Wendy Wood about my bad habits. Professor of psychology at the University of Southern California, Wood researches how habits guide behaviour and has written a new book about it: Good Habits, Bad Habits: The Science of Making Positive Changes That Stick. Not market-driven self-help, it is based on research, data, actual science. I hope she will help me to understand my bad habits, change them, and maybe even pick up a few good ones.

What are my unwanted habits, though, since I quit smoking? I should probably look at Twitter a little less, but that’s everyone, right? Or Facebook, Instagram; whatever it is you look at your phone for. There is a chapter at the end of Wood’s book, How to Stop Looking at Your Phone So Often. You have to start off by noticing you are doing it, then use some of the tools you have hopefully picked up in the preceding pages, such as controlling the cues to the behaviour, adding friction ... we will get to some of that.

Continue reading...

January 18th 2020, 4:09 am

The best DIY gel manicure removal | Sali Hughes

Life and style | The Guardian

Shellac and gel won’t wreck your nails if they are good quality and removed properly – I’ve got the method down pat

Two friends tell me that one of their new year’s resolutions is taking a break from gels and ultraviolet lamp-cured, soak-off nail polishes. That’s because, despite the dramatic global increase in salon gel manicures, thanks to an instantly dry, super-shiny finish that lasts up to three weeks instead of the traditional three to five days (seriously, it’s a bleak time for regular polish brands), there’s a pervading belief that gels ultimately “wreck your nails”.

This is only a tiny bit true, in that all manicures involving repeated filing and exposure to solvents will weaken the nails in the long term: the issue is not with gels per se. What does damage gel-polished nails specifically is picking, peeling and other heavy-handed removal, or poor application (including excessive roughening of the nail surface) that later requires it.

Continue reading...

January 18th 2020, 3:22 am

Bombshell gets Fox News look 'spot on' say former anchors

Life and style | The Guardian

Jay Roach’s film centres on accusations of sexual harassment at US channel

It’s not often a TV channel can be credited with creating its own fashion “look” but, in the case of Fox News, fashion and style have become central to the broadcaster’s brand. The almost identical blonde, blow-dried hairstyles, worn with short sheath dresses and stilettos by the channel’s female anchors are also a key feature of Bombshell, Jay Roach’s biographical film, which opened in UK cinemas on Friday.

The film centres on accusations of sexual harassment levelled at the former chief executive Roger Ailes by Fox News employees, while also depicting a toxic workplace culture imbued with sexism and secrecy.

Continue reading...

January 17th 2020, 1:00 pm

Is it possible to make friends with your neighbours? | Coco Khan

Life and style | The Guardian

Perhaps I don’t speak to them because they don’t to me, and vice versa

Recently my mum (who lives at No 3) received a mysterious note in an elegant envelope from No 9, the lesser-known neighbours three doors down. A party invitation! Silver, cursive handwriting slid across thick black paper (“delighted”, “join us”) signed with no names, just “No 9” and an x. This had never happened before.

“It’s so you don’t dob them in to the police,” I ventured. “Everyone knows if you ask your neighbours to a party, they are less likely to grass you up. They must be planning a noisy one.”

Continue reading...

January 17th 2020, 9:09 am

How to wear men’s cardigans | Priya Elan

Life and style | The Guardian

Thanks to Harry Styles, Tyler, the Creator and Brian Cox in Succession, the cardigan is now cool

Something strange is happening with cardigans right now. We have sprinted past the moment when they were the limp cousin of the jumper, worn only if one wanted to signal a love of secondhand paperbacks. Now, in an era of aggressive layering, the associations of feyness have faded and the cardigan has become an essential part of a man’s winter wardrobe.

Worn over a T-shirt or a shirt – and with large thanks to Gucci and Harry Styles, Tyler, the Creator and Brian Cox in Succession – wearing the cardigan is now (dundundun!) cool.

Continue reading...

January 17th 2020, 8:26 am

My boyfriend and I agreed we didn’t want children – but now I’m not sure

Life and style | The Guardian

I always secretly hoped he would change his mind, and the window for me to have children is closing

I love my boyfriend very much. We live together and get along really well. The thing is he doesn’t want children and has been open about that from the start. At the beginning, I told him I felt the same but was secretly hoping he’d change his mind. I’m still not sure if I do want kids myself. My friends think I’m just trying to convince myself that I’ll be OK without having children. I’m not so sure, but the window for me to have them is fast closing (I’m 39). What should I do?

When leaving a message on this page, please be sensitive to the fact that you are responding to a real person in the grip of a real-life dilemma, who wrote to Private Lives asking for help and may well view your comments here. Please consider especially how your words or the tone of your message could be perceived by someone in this situation, and be aware that comments that appear to be disruptive or disrespectful to the individual concerned will be removed.

Continue reading...

January 17th 2020, 7:24 am

Anna Jones’ recipes for a winter soup and breakfast smoothie | The Modern Cook

Life and style | The Guardian

Filling and healthy make-ahead recipes for a refreshing coriander and sweet potato soup, and a smoothie you can make the night before to kickstart your mornings

Each year around mid-January, I crave a short period of simplicity in the food I eat; a reset of my palate and tastebuds. I’m not talking about a diet, as I don’t go in for those, but a short snap of eating simpler food to make me think about the eating habits I have built up.

Like anyone else, I get into patterns and habits with food: some good, some bad, and driven as much by emotion as nutrition, so I do a reset to help me connect with what I am eating again. It breaks the habits I have fallen into and allows me to reconsider why I am eating, when I am eating and what really feels good for me and my body.

Continue reading...

January 17th 2020, 7:24 am

Eternally individual: a letter to my teenage self

Life and style | The Guardian

From dealing with heartbreak and defying gender norms, to saying no to alt-rock and yes to Abba, editor and critic Malcolm Mackenzie offers life advice to his younger self

Dear Malcolm,

I’m here from the future – go with it – to tell you some very important stuff I’ve learned in the 20 or so years since I was you. OK, it’s not that important, because I know how this space-time continuum business works: one life tweak could send us spiralling into a woebegone reality.

Continue reading...

January 17th 2020, 6:24 am

Experience: my brother framed me for murder

Life and style | The Guardian

My brother had withdrawn his confession and my parents testified that at the time of the murder he was at home with them. I was sentenced to life

My brother, Tom, and I were never close. He was two years older than me. I don’t know why, but my parents sheltered him. They were farmers and we lived in Kansas with three older half-siblings. All us kids were in competition for their attention.

I moved out at 18 and found work at a local dairy farm where they were willing to teach me. My parents and Tom lived five miles away but I didn’t visit much. By the time I was 23, I was living with my wife and our two young sons. We’d been married three years but the relationship was rocky. That August, my wife’s sister, Camille, who was 14, moved in with us.

Continue reading...

January 17th 2020, 5:24 am

My life in sex: ‘I no longer worry about my foreskin getting trapped’

Life and style | The Guardian

The man who was circumcised in his late 20s

When I started having sex at 21, I was expecting clumsy awkwardness, not pain. But during penetrative sex, I found it was impossible to retract my foreskin without experiencing incredible discomfort. Either I would need to stop and put things right – a moodkiller – or fake an orgasm. Eventually I learned to avoid sex altogether. I was too embarrassed to talk to a doctor.

Seven years and a handful of partners later, I was finally mature enough to acknowledge the problem. After speaking to a GP and two separate consultants, I was diagnosed with a condition called phimosis – a tightening of the foreskin – and advised to have a circumcision.

Continue reading...

January 17th 2020, 5:24 am

Silo, London E5: ‘Loud, righteous and holy’ – restaurant review | Grace Dent

Life and style | The Guardian

Silo’s zero-waste concept is laudable, but they seem to have forgotten that eating out is meant to be fun

“So what do you know about Silo?” asks our server, crouching down by the table. She pauses like a school teacher waiting for me to fill in the gap. I say nothing, being not in the mood for a test.

She changes tack: “Do you know about our concept?”

Continue reading...

January 17th 2020, 5:08 am

How Telfar's shopping bag became a symbol of fashion democracy

Life and style | The Guardian

Nicknamed the ‘Bushwick Birkin’, the 100% vegan leather shoppers found fame through the diverse communities embracing them

Every era has a bag that defines the times: the 80s had the Birkin; the 90s had the Carrie Bradshaw-endorsed Fendi Baguette; the 00s brought us the massive Chloé Paddington, which was aligned with the excesses of the likes of Paris Hilton, Lindsay Lohan and the Olsens, and then came Mansur Gavriel’s bucket bag.


Now we have Telfar’s shopping bags. Made from 100% vegan leather, the shoppers feature Telfar’s embossed “TC” logo and come in three sizes and nine different colours, including black, tan, white, dark olive and oxblood. The bags are notable for their adaptability, and feature straps and handles which means they work for both formal and functional uses). But, more fittingly in an era of social media, the s0-called “Bushwick Birkin” has come to indicate wider representation in a largely white-dominated fashion world and has been described by Telfar Clemens as “genderless, democratic, and transformative.”

Continue reading...

January 17th 2020, 5:08 am

Do not adjust your set: Gwyneth Paltrow is spreading Goop all over TV

Life and style | The Guardian

Everyone’s favourite turbocharged wellness capitalist has laid out her stall in the trailer for her new Netflix show. But what does any of it mean?

Huge excitement in TV’s burgeoning disinfomercial genre, as Gwyneth Paltrow’s Netflix show prepares to make landfall next week. Based on her lifestyle portal, currently valued at $250m, The Goop Lab will see the turbocapitalist fanny-egg entrepreneur take us to new frontiers in the wellness universe.

Incidentally, I just want to say right off the bat that I still have no idea what “wellness” even means, but I make sure to always use it with an appearance of knowingness, like I do with “neoliberalism” or “cervix”. In fact, I am beginning to think there may be some semantic overlap between all three of the aforementioned concepts. And once I’ve read all the books in the world about all the other subjects, I guess I’ll force myself to get around to finding out.

Continue reading...

January 17th 2020, 5:08 am

Five of the UK's best adventure and wellness festivals in 2020

Life and style | The Guardian

Combine active, healthy days with nights of partying at an increasingly popular type of festival, where outdoor pursuits meet live music

15-17 May
With a view of Skiddaw from your tent, the 13th Keswick Mountain Festival makes the most of its Lake District setting and combines outdoor activities with live music and talks. Festivalgoers may not spend too long under canvas though, as the 2020 schedule includes the largest programme of activities yet, including 18 running, cycling, swimming, multi-sport and hiking events. There are 5K, 10K, 25K and 50K running trails plus a daily, timed 18-mile hike around Derwentwater – and another 16-mile route around Coledale peaks, with more than 1,200 metres of ascent. There are also sportives for cyclists (including juniors), triathlons, open-water aquathlons and family fell trail puzzles and obstacle courses. Taster activities are included in the ticket price and in previous years included tree-climbing, archery, Segways, slacklining and caving. Talks feature wilderness hiker, writer and presenter Cameron McNeish, and Paul Tierney discussing his new record for running up all 214 Wainwrights (Lake District fells over 1,000 feet). Details of live music are still to be announced – Cast, KT Tunstall, and Bez have played in previous years.
From £75 adult, £45 child, £195 family of four including camping (less without camping), larger sporting event entries from £13, keswickmountainfestival.co.uk

Continue reading...

January 17th 2020, 5:08 am

My week as a Hemsworth: can Chris and Elsa combat my mid-30s physical ennui? | Luke Ryan

Life and style | The Guardian

Chris Hemsworth and Elsa Pataky have both released wellness manuals. Luke Ryan tries to follow along with one of the world’s fittest couples

My wife is hesitant. “You want us to work out together?”

“Not work out: train. Elsa and Chris say training together is the key to their relationship.” I’m talking, of course, about Byron Bay’s fittest couple, Elsa Pataky and Chris Hemsworth. She’s Elena in the Fast and the Furious series. He’s Thor. Toned, sculpted, defined: theirs are the bodies of the gods themselves, in his case almost literally.

Continue reading...

January 17th 2020, 5:08 am

I love bumping into an old friend | Hannah Jane Parkinson

Life and style | The Guardian

What a joy, what a bonus, to run into someone one hasn’t seen in an age

Few would deny the awkwardness of bumping into someone you’d rather not. Not even, necessarily, somebody you dislike: perhaps it’s a colleague on the bus, and you are tired. Or it’s a friend of a friend; likable but loquacious. It’s an ex. Oh God, it’s an ex.

But the discomfort of hoping your neighbour from four years ago doesn’t notice you in a doctor’s waiting room can be matched only by the pleasure of a serendipitous meeting of an old acquaintance walking her dog or – this happened to me – spotting a school friend, by chance, on the other side of the world.

Continue reading...

January 17th 2020, 5:08 am

From Pharrell’s chin plaster to glitter: this week’s fashion trends

Life and style | The Guardian

What’s hot and what’s not in fashion this week

Pharrell’s chin plaster It’s back! Previously seen in Mickey Mouse print in 2014, the face accessory returned in muted tones for Diddy’s birthday party.

Continue reading...

January 17th 2020, 2:05 am

The best activewear for all ages – in pictures

Life and style | The Guardian

If you’ve joined a gym or want to upgrade your wardrobe, you’re spoilt for choice

Continue reading...

January 17th 2020, 2:05 am

Mindful eating gurus call for silence at the table. Where’s the fun in that?

Life and style | The Guardian

Let’s hear it for mindless eating: for noise and clamour, for shouting and burping

Amid the blizzard of diet cobblers that fills my inbox at this time of year, generally promising to cleanse you of all evidence that you ever ate anything at all, is one email that made me roll my eyeballs with such intensity I’m sure the neighbours could hear the grinding of flesh. It proposes “mindful eating”. A few ill-advised clicks later and I land on a self-styled food guru’s manifesto. “Have you ever noticed,” it starts, “how incredibly silent it becomes at dinner as soon as the food hits the table? Then you may have experienced mindful eating.”

Honestly, no. Not in my house. And long may that continue. According to our nutritional adviser too many of us eat semi-consciously. We are careless. We give no consideration to taste and texture. We are bad to the core. Part of the solution, apparently, is silence. This, she suggests, will help us towards mindful eating. It’s a new one on me. Ever the diligent reporter, I Google the term. Good God. There are more than two million references to it. Mindful eating is actually a thing.

Continue reading...

January 16th 2020, 9:40 am

Versace bans kangaroo skin after pressure from activists

Life and style | The Guardian

Italian campaigners confirm company has stopped using skins in leather goods

The Italian fashion house Versace has banned the use of kangaroo skin for its luxury leather products collection. The move follows pressure from the animal rights’ group LAV, which said more than 2.3 million kangaroos in Australia were killed each year for commercial purposes.

Versace did not comment but gave LAV permission to make an announcement.

Continue reading...

January 16th 2020, 7:08 am

How to have an eco-friendly ski holiday in Austria’s Zillertal

Life and style | The Guardian

From opting to travel by train to booking sustainable accommodation, follow these tips for a guilt-free skiing trip in the Zillertal valley in Tirol in Austria

A 190m cubic metre river of ice flows through Austria’s Zillertal valley. Of course, like all glaciers, at between one and 200 metres per year, the Hintertux glacier moves too slowly to notice. However, its presence provides something that skiers can’t ignore: year-round skiing.

The glacier is up to 120 metres deep in places, and four kilometres long, but this can vary every year by up to 40 metres, meaning that the pylons holding up the lifts have to be moved several times each year to ensure they remain vertical. In winter, you can enjoy the Gefrorene Wand (Frozen Wall) run down from here; at 12 kilometres, it’s the longest in the region.

Continue reading...

January 16th 2020, 6:21 am

The agony of weekend loneliness: ‘I won't speak to another human until Monday’

Life and style | The Guardian

For growing numbers of people the weekend is an emotional wilderness where interaction is minimal and social life non-existent. What can be done to break this toxic cycle?

On Saturday morning, Peter got up and went to the supermarket. He carried his shopping home, and took care of his laundry and ironing. In the afternoon, he browsed a few record stores and later he cooked himself dinner; always something adventurous on a Saturday night. Afterwards, he hit Netflix. And in all those hours, in common with many of Peter’s Saturdays, not to mention his Sundays, he had no meaningful interaction with another human being. “The only person I spoke to,” he says, “was the lady who came over to verify my bottles of beer at the supermarket self-checkout.”

During the week, Peter, 62, is too busy to be lonely. His commute from Brighton to London means that his working life is “a tunnel” he enters on a Monday and from which no daylight is glimpsed until Friday. But just when Peter re-emerges, he is stymied by an overwhelming sense of loneliness. Instead of providing respite from the stress of office life, a chance to reconnect with family and friends, the weekend looms as a vast emotional and social wilderness that must be traversed before work takes hold again.

Continue reading...

January 16th 2020, 4:51 am

This is what midlife looks like for women

Life and style | The Guardian

Guts, blood, hair, sex and love – it’s time to reclaim menopause as a time for self-discovery

Middle-aged women have long been treated as the punchlines of jokes in popular culture – as the crazy witches at the end of the street, or worse, as invisible members of society who cease to exist once their reproductive years are over. But a host of artists have recently focused their attention on the experiences of women in midlife, from Darcey Steinke’s Flash Count Diary to Susan P Matterns’ The Slow Moon Climbs.

This new wave of attention is joined by photographer Elinor Carucci’s Midlife. In her introduction to the book, Kristen Roupenian writes that Carucci’s photographs invoke the “intense, exhausting self-monitoring that can feel like an inescapable part of owning a female body”.

Continue reading...

January 16th 2020, 4:35 am

A heavy topic: how to change the way your family speaks about weight

Life and style | The Guardian

While the body positivity movement is making inroads in the media, for many an obsession with thinness begins at home

Weight bias is as prevalent in today’s society as diet plans. And detox teas. And the celebrities who promote diet plans and detox teas.

When we experience weight stigma – and I’m not talking about being fat, I’m talking about feeling as if you’re too fat – it puts us at risk of disordered eating, makes us avoid exercise (especially in public), worsens our physical and mental health, and even limits our future employment opportunities.

Continue reading...

January 16th 2020, 4:35 am

‘I sliced the tops off four fingers’: what my worst kitchen accidents taught me

Life and style | The Guardian

Broken glass, boiling water, sausages: you name it, it’s possible to injure yourself with it. As I have demonstrated …

‘Unlike regular knives,” runs the press release for Viners’ new cutlery, “the pointed end has been removed, helping to tackle knife-related injuries.” And there’s a picture. They look quite silly without a pointy end, but they also call into question why this has never been done before – indeed, why kitchen knives evolved to be the shape they are. Because you never use the point, or maybe you do once every couple of years for a particularly slidey tomato. All regular chopping is done with the blade edge.

I shall not be buying a pointless knife but I thought I would take the opportunity to run through the top kitchen injuries of myself and everyone I know, so that younger readers can avoid them. Note: almost all of these start with being drunk. If you’re never drunk, you could probably keep a leopard in your kitchen and get away with it.

Continue reading...

January 16th 2020, 4:35 am

All hail the horizontal workout! Six ways that sex improves your health

Life and style | The Guardian

A new study suggests regular sex can help prevent early menopause. And there’s lots of other research to suggest the benefits of a bit of slap and tickle

Women in their mid-40s to mid-50s who have weekly sex are 28% less likely to have an early menopause than women who have sex once a month or less, according to a new study from University College London. But that’s not the only reason to maintain an active sex life. (Safe) sex is good for you. Don’t trust me? Here’s the science.

Continue reading...

January 15th 2020, 12:56 pm

Off-White's Virgil Abloh smartens up to create more Instagram gold

Life and style | The Guardian

Inspired by Leonardo da Vinci, the streetwear pioneer is adding more strings to his bow

Off-White, founded by the tastemaker Virgil Abloh – who is also the designer of Louis Vuitton menswear – is one of the most hyped labels in fashion. At the autumn/winter 2020 show in Paris on Wednesday morning, though, audience members had to wait for the first sighting of the items set to get a lot of play on Instagram next season. The show instead began with sound: that of a lone tapdancer’s shoes.

Cartier Williams, a tap veteran who danced at the White House for Bill Clinton, continued to perform in a spotlight as models began to populate the space in the basement of a shopping mall. It was part fashion show, part Broadway show – an unusual combination that, once again, showed Abloh’s knack for creating social media gold as well as designing clothes.

Continue reading...

January 15th 2020, 10:08 am

Milan men's fashion week: 10 key collections – in pictures

Life and style | The Guardian

A slow-mo rave at Marni, rush hour at Prada and a recycled deadstock art installation at Ermenegildo Zegna … here are the menswear show highlights for autumn/winter 2020

Continue reading...

January 15th 2020, 10:08 am

‘Make the most of loyalty cards’ and nine other spending tips for spontaneous lifestyles

Life and style | The Guardian

It’s not easy to save at the best of times – and it’s even tougher if you’re prone to some last-minute spending. None of us want to miss out on that party invite or weekend away. Now you won’t have to

You’ve heard it a million times: the secret to staying on budget is to plan ahead. But, for many of us, that’s easier said than done. We work so hard that we don’t have time to organise things far in advance, nor are we able to devote as much energy to our finances as we should. But, also, it’s simply a lot of fun to be spontaneous and make the most of opportunities that come up.

For that reason, it isn’t always easy to stick rigidly to a budget. Last-minute expenses, invitations for weekends away, or celebrations with friends and family can often come up unexpectedly. But if you’re canny with it, you can be spontaneous without going overboard. So here are 10 smart ways to spend that even the busiest person can stick to.

Continue reading...

January 15th 2020, 6:19 am

A growing concern: is it ever OK to steal plant cuttings?

Life and style | The Guardian

Gardeners and collectors have shared cuttings for generations, but as certain plants have become status symbols, questions of ethical grey areas have arisen

In December, Cory Jarrell of Portland, Oregon, posted a photo he never imagined he would have to share with his 16,000 Instagram followers: loose, limp cuttings of plants, pinched off without permission from over a dozen rare plants.

Jarrell’s specialty plant shop, Potted Elephant, had suffered a fate experienced by a small but growing number of nurseries, shops and botanical gardens in the wake of the booming specialty plant market: unscrupulous collectors and sellers pilfering cuttings (and sometimes, entire plants) without permission in order to resell online and net a profit.

Continue reading...

January 15th 2020, 6:19 am

Suits you: the welcome rise of the influencer blazer

Life and style | The Guardian

Once considered smart but stuffy, the humble blazer – versatile, affordable and easy to wear – now fills the role previously held by blackout shades and Louboutin pumps

The hottest look on Instagram is no longer a bra-digan (sorry, Katie Holmes); it is a blazer. That’s right – a sensible, grownup, seasonally appropriate and useful jacket. Strange, but true.

There is a new breed of style selfie getting major likes. The setting will be an urban street scene: photogenic, but not glamorous. Waiting for the lights to change to cross a cobbled street, say, rather than in a fancy hotel room. The props and pose will be carefully chosen to semaphore busyness and curated realness: a reusable coffee cup or possibly an umbrella in one hand; the other hand oh-so-casually in a pocket.

Continue reading...

January 15th 2020, 6:19 am

So your friend came out as non-binary: here’s how to use pronouns they/them

Life and style | The Guardian

Janelle Monáe just came out as non-binary, joining a growing number of people who use ‘they/them’ as pronouns. You might be wondering how to address them

On Friday, Janelle Monáe came out as non-binary, retweeting a post which read: “There is absolutely nothing better than living outside the gender binary.”

Monáe’s tweet came after the recent announcement of Sam Smith, who recently said they felt “just as much a woman as I am man”. Both celebrities joined the increasing number of young people who identify neither as male or female.

Continue reading...

January 15th 2020, 4:04 am

Collapsed: but threats to pick up the bills from these energy companies continue

Life and style | The Guardian

Debt collectors are still sending out demands for unsubstantiated ‘final’ sums

Your article “Pay Up or Else” reported that customers of the defunct Extra Energy are being threatened over unsubstantiated final bills. I have a similar problem with Corporate Debt Solutions Global, debt collector for failed energy supplier Solarplicity.

I switched from Solarplicity to Eversmart in July, three weeks before the former ceased trading, and provided up-to-date meter readings to both. In October, CDS sent a £142 final bill based on estimated figures, without explanation. I asked for a revised bill based on my readings. Instead, I received threats of legal enforcement unless I paid. My three further requests for an accurate bill have been ignored.

Continue reading...

January 15th 2020, 4:04 am

Why can’t women get a cheap cut at the barber?

Life and style | The Guardian

A female customer who went into a barber was told she would ‘put men off’. But why is the price between hairdressers and barbers so vast?

As Silvio Dante says in The Sopranos, two industries have always been recession-proof: show business and the mob. To which I will add a third: haircuts. They’re a racket. Hair will always grow, and it will always need to be cut.

I know hairdressing is competitive, hairdressers are skilled professionals and running a salon is expensive. To which I would reply, fine – but then how are barbers making money?

Continue reading...

January 15th 2020, 3:16 am

Scientists cite parasite factor in beard attractiveness debate

Life and style | The Guardian

Scientists say women who are more repulsed by lice are less likely to find beards attractive

Prince Harry sports one, Justin Trudeau has recently grown one, and Brian Blessed’s is almost its own being. But are beards attractive? As the old adage goes: “Depends on the man, depends on the beard.”

Now researchers have found there might be another factor: whether a potential partner fears there might be something living in it.

Continue reading...

January 14th 2020, 7:30 pm

Gucci channels the inner child at Milan men's fashion week

Life and style | The Guardian

Dark spectre of innocence lost loomed with school shoes and babydoll dresses given punk edge

Gucci closed Milan fashion week with a gothic celebration of childhood.

In front of guests which included Jared Leto, Mark Ronson and Anderson Paak, designer Alessandro Michele mixed classic Gucci elements including loafer shoes, berets and box jackets with Mary Jane school shoes, jeans scuffed with grass stains, pelerine socks pulled up to the calf and lunch boxes.

Continue reading...

January 14th 2020, 12:08 pm

Are you really at your most miserable at 47.2 years old?

Life and style | The Guardian

A study says that we all tend to be at our most unhappy at the same point in life – are we hardwired for it, or is there another reason?

Name: 47.2.

Age: 47.2.

Continue reading...

January 14th 2020, 11:10 am

Caitlyn Jenner: ‘It was tough wearing a bustier for Vanity Fair’

Life and style | The Guardian

The TV star and Olympic champion discusses her approach to fashion and her favourite outfit – the Donatella Versace dress she wore for her first public appearance after transitioning

This dress sticks in my mind because that moment was so extraordinarily important, not just for me but for the entire LGBT community. It was my first public appearance [after transitioning], at the Excellence in Sports Performance Yearly awards (the Espys) in 2015, and I couldn’t believe it when Donatella Versace said she would love to design my dress for the event.

In the old days, buying clothes was one of the most difficult tasks. I had a friend of mine use a debit card with her name on it, and I had a secure email address so I could buy things online – it was very challenging, because I couldn’t out myself. When Donatella had her tailors fly over with this dress, I couldn’t believe it – I thought: three months ago I couldn’t get clothes. Now I’ve got tailors flying in!

Continue reading...

January 14th 2020, 9:24 am

Forget cat ladies: the real tribes of modern dating, from fantasists to routiners

Life and style | The Guardian

Finding a mate now involves navigating the perils of sword enthusiasts, 9/11 ‘truthers’ and the risk that it’s your beagle they really want, rather than you

Ten years ago, in my second year at university, I threw a Lord of the Rings-themed party. I would be embarrassed about committing this to print had it not been in New Zealand, where all parties are Lord of the Rings-themed.

I was a Ringwraith, having spent an unfeasible amount of money on eBay for a hobby horse. Some guests on the way to my house in costume, were accosted by strangers of about our age, who asked: were they going to a Lord of the Rings-themed party?

Continue reading...

January 14th 2020, 9:24 am

Samsung Gear VR – can a virtual-reality app save me from digital overload?

Life and style | The Guardian

Mindfulness technology sounds like an oxymoron. Time to discover whether putting on goggles to gaze at views usually enjoyed only by the ultra-rich can calm an overstimulated brain

At school, I knew a boy who made himself smoke a carton of Marlboro Red in a week. He didn’t like cigarettes, but wanted to get addicted, he said. A mission statement I remember for being a huge amount of stupid to fit into so few words. His logic was that the way to feel less sickened by fags was to smoke 200 of them. Yet I am struck by a similar contradiction while testing the Guided Meditation VR app for Samsung’s virtual-reality headset, Gear VR (£119, samsung.com).

Many of us feel digitally overloaded and crave mental peace. But can the balm to our overstimulated brains lie within another screen? Isn’t mindfulness technology an oxymoron?

Continue reading...

January 14th 2020, 5:18 am

I’m fixated on a one-night stand my wife had before we met. What should I do?

Life and style | The Guardian

We have been together more than 50 years, but I’ve become envious, troubled and titillated by what happened when I was still a virgin. Should we discuss it?

My wife and I have been married for over 50 years and have an enviably happy existence. Before our marriage, my wife had many sexual partners, while I was a virgin. When I think about her previous relationships I never worry about partners who were boyfriends, but I am troubled by a one-night stand she had. I had put this completely to one side until recently. Now, I am overcome with curiosity, and want to ask her about it. I admire her early liberation – something I never had. I am both envious and titillated. Should I talk to her or let it go?

Your loving obsession will not be easily assuaged. And after 50 years, it seems reasonable for you to inquire. Hearing more about her past sexual experiences is likely to enhance your sexual connection, so why not pursue it? Approach the subject in a seductive fashion, first letting her know your interest in it is based on titillation rather than jealousy. A word of caution, though. I sense that the mystery of that one-night stand is both endlessly fascinating for you – as well as an instrument of sweet torture. Do you really want cold, hard facts to replace such a romantic and passionate fixation? Your choice.

Continue reading...

January 14th 2020, 5:18 am

So long, salt and vinegar: how crisp flavours went from simple to sensational

Life and style | The Guardian

It was five decades after crisps were invented that flavouring was applied: cheese and onion. Now you can buy varieties from bratwurst to spiced cola. But what inspired this explosion?

When she was a little girl in Essex in the 50s, Linda Miller would go over to her neighbour Barbara’s house every Friday night and together they would sit on the front step eating crisps. There was only one flavour widely available back then – Smith’s plain potato crisps, which came with a small blue sachet of salt that could be sprinkled over them. One Friday night, the two friends struck upon an idea. “We thought we’d invented a new crisp,” says 68-year-old Miller. Inspired by their weekly fish and chip takeaway, the pair “saturated” their plain crisps with a bottle of vinegar. “It was lovely, lovely – very tasty,” Miller says. “When salt and vinegar crisps came out, I remember thinking: ‘They’re not as good as what we do.’”

Crisps were first mass-produced in the early 20th century, but the first flavoured crisp was released only in the late 50s, after Joe “Spud” Murphy, the owner of the Irish company Tayto, developed a technique to add cheese and onion seasoning during production. Salt and vinegar crisps were launched throughout the UK a decade later, in 1967, when Miller was 16.

Continue reading...

January 14th 2020, 5:04 am

‘AA’s rules are for men’: Holly Whitaker on how women can stop drinking – and get happy

Life and style | The Guardian

When she decided to quit drinking, Whitaker turned, like many people, to Alcoholics Anonymous. She didn’t like what she found there, so she decided to create her own unique approach

When Holly Whitaker looks back on the many nights that would disappear in a boozy haze, it wasn’t the anxiety and regret that made her realise she needed to get help for her drinking, but sheer exhaustion. Each weekend, while hungover, she would wearily erase all evidence of her drinking binges: the stains on her bed, the empty bottles, the rubbish bags. She was holding it together with a lucrative job as the director of a healthcare startup, had a great flat in San Francisco and a busy social life, but suddenly she just couldn’t do it any more.

“When I binged, I would close my eyes while I did it,” she says. “I was trying to not see how horrific it was. I would go through this process of scrubbing it away, then presenting myself to the world and pretending that nothing was wrong. Then I had this moment when I couldn’t not see it.”

Continue reading...

January 14th 2020, 5:04 am

Giorgio goes gorpcore: Armani channels The Matrix in Milan

Life and style | The Guardian

Futuristic autumn/winter menswear collection takes dystopian design a step too far

A surprising turn of events on the fourth day of Milan men’s fashion week: Armani has embraced extreme “gorpcore”. The trend of wearing outdoorsy clothes in the city was a dominant theme at the Italian fashion label’s cinematic autumn/winter collection.

Continue reading...

January 14th 2020, 3:30 am

Face time: will the new makeup for men hide my blotches – or create new anxieties?

Life and style | The Guardian

More men than ever are embracing grooming, and now there’s a whole makeup line just for us. But shouldn’t we just learn to love our hard-earned eye bags?

It has been a while since I wore makeup. A bit of eyeliner and mascara in the 80s, not a lot since. Now, at 54, the cracks, bags and blotches are taking over; a new pop-up makeup counter for men could be what I need. It has popped up at John Lewis’s Oxford Street store in London, which is safe and reliable, right? And the British brand doing it is called War Paint for Men. Yeah, I’m not just beautifying myself, I’m a warrior!

The War Paint founder Danny Gray, 34 (looks younger), will be doing my makeup today, quite publicly, in the menswear department on the ground floor. Since being bullied for his sticky-out ears at school, Gray has experienced body dysmorphia. When, as a teenager, he started getting spots, his sister offered to help conceal them.

Continue reading...

January 14th 2020, 3:30 am

How we met: ‘After two weeks, we were living together’

Life and style | The Guardian

Rachel Wade, 30, met her partner Stephen Lavenberg, 32, when they were working in Liberia during the Ebola outbreak. They are now married and live in Myanmar

When Ebola swept through west Africa in 2014, many foreign workers were evacuated from the region. For Rachel, who had been working on an educational development project in Liberia, being sent home to Britain was frustrating. “I really wanted to support colleagues. I felt so helpless.”

In early 2015, she was given the all-clear to head back to the city of Monrovia. “I was meant to be meeting a friend for dinner and she told me she was bringing her new colleague, Stephen,” she says. After a tough few weeks, Rachel wasn’t in the mood to meet new people. “Plus, she’d heard I was American,” says Stephen, with a smile. “The worst.”

Continue reading...

January 13th 2020, 12:46 pm

Why is Gwyneth Paltrow selling a candle that smells like her vagina?

Life and style | The Guardian

Gwyneth has made a candle called This Smells Like My Vagina for her website, Goop. And, of course, it has sold out

I hear that I can now buy a candle that smells like Gwyneth Paltrow’s vagina. What?

Hilary, by email

Continue reading...

January 13th 2020, 12:46 pm

‘You don’t feel like you belong anywhere’ – the plight of the hidden homeless

Life and style | The Guardian

It isn’t just rough sleepers who are homeless. Crisis estimates that 62% of single homeless people are ‘hidden homeless’, who sofa-surf or find other temporary solutions

Mark, a 35-year-old former soldier from Kent, has spent the past seven years sofa-surfing. It’s a term that perhaps sounds carefree or edgy, but is anything but. “I’ve slept on a sofa, a mattress in a corner, had a spare room. I have no stability any more – you don’t feel like you belong anywhere,” he says. “You’re begging favours so you’re always living by someone else’s rules. You want your own place, your own shower, your own bed. After a while complacency kicks in, then your mates begin to get irritated with the situation and you get irritated. Arguments start, the friendship breaks down. I don’t talk to many of them any more.”

Mark is one of the “hidden homeless” – people who have no place of their own but who avoid sleeping rough by finding a temporary solution, such as staying with family members or friends. Others live in squats (although squatting in a residential building has been illegal since September 2012) or other insecure accommodation such as cars, or they get into inappropriate relationships in order to keep a roof over their heads.

Continue reading...

January 13th 2020, 7:28 am

Prada works commuter chic at Milan men's fashion week

Life and style | The Guardian

A surreal take on tailoring echoed masculine workwear themes seen elsewhere

On the third day of Milan men’s fashion week, the concept of the working man emerged as a theme in the newest collection from Prada.

The brand, which skipped Milan last season to show instead in Shanghai, showcased a collection which focused on formality and tailoring but with Miuccia Prada’s surreal touches. On a set that was designed to replicate a futuristic town square (a white statue of a man on a horse stood in the centre of the box-like runway), models replicated Prada-ised commuters on their way to work.

Continue reading...

January 13th 2020, 5:25 am

Joining a choir helped me combat anxiety and find a meditative state of pure joy

Life and style | The Guardian

Faced with panic attacks and depression, I looked to my creative past for inspiration on how to improve the present. Rediscovering singing proved the turning point I needed

When it comes to looking after your mental health, there is a lot of advice about what to start doing and what to stop, but sometimes the remedy is something that has been in the background all along. Which poses the question: what have I stopped doing that once made me, me?

About six years ago I started having panic attacks. I began my journey to crack them with traditional tools, including therapy, keeping active, meditation and medication, all of which were a great help. Thankfully, a year later medication was no longer needed and neither was therapy. Problem solved.

Continue reading...

January 13th 2020, 3:54 am
Get it on Google Play تحميل تطبيق نبأ للآندرويد مجانا