Get it on Google Play تحميل تطبيق نبأ للآندرويد مجانا

Kelsey Juliana: 'What if fashion came to represent a new way of living?'

Life and style | The Guardian

The climate activist who joined forces with a billionaire designer

Kelsey Juliana, a youth climate activist from Oregon, is joining forces with Gabriela Hearst, a fashion designer whose clothes are worn by Lady Gaga and the Duchess of Sussex, to ignite a trend they hope will become a global sensation.

Juliana, 23, is the lead plaintiff in a group lawsuit suing the US government for breaching the human rights of her generation by failing to take action to protect the environment. The case, Juliana v United States – which goes by the unofficial name of Youth v Gov – aims to have the US supreme court order the government to dramatically change energy policy. Hearst – who, with her husband, John Augustine Hearst, the scion of the magazine empire, has a net worth estimated at £1.5bn – is providing financial backing for the case.

Continue reading...

November 20th 2019, 1:45 pm

To eat or not to eat: 10 of the world's most controversial foods

Life and style | The Guardian

From beef to cod to avocados to soya, many of our best-loved foods raise big ethical and environmental questions. What do the experts say?

Deforestation. Child labour. Pollution. Water shortages. The more we learn about the side-effects of food production, the more the act of feeding ourselves becomes fraught with anxiety. How can we be sure that certain foods are “good” or “bad” for society and the planet? As Tim Lang, professor of food policy at City University of London and the co-author of Sustainable Diets, puts it: “When you come to ‘judge’ food, you end up with an enormous list of variables, from taste to health outcomes to biodiversity.” Here are some of today’s most controversial products – and some thoughts that may help you when shopping.

Continue reading...

November 20th 2019, 11:45 am

The lifestyle happiness manager – a very modern dogsbody

Life and style | The Guardian

Fifteen quid an hour and you get to choose the coolest clothes, food and drinks … for your bosses, whom you also have to wake up in the morning

Age: New posting.

Appearance: Part time, about four hours a day.

Continue reading...

November 20th 2019, 11:09 am

Mulling is over if you want it: a guide to festive vodka cocktails

Life and style | The Guardian

Start new traditions this Christmas and stave off overindulgence with festive vodka cocktails from mixologist Joe McCanta

Old habits die hard, especially at Christmas. As a tradition it offers a reassuringly familiar checklist of experiences after a busy and unpredictable year – and, no matter how little sense they make (do we really gain anything from pulling crackers except for a small pile of mess on the dinner table?), we return to our yuletide customs without fail.

Festive food and drink is a perfect example of this. The turkey, the stuffing, the Christmas pudding, the mulled wine, the eggnog; each has its own individual merits, of course, but indulging in all of them in one day is ridiculous unless you’re actively trying for indigestion. But each gives us that all-important, indescribable feeling of Christmas, so we persist at our peril. To hit all the positive psychological triggers that festive food and drink provides, without the digestive drawbacks of piling decadence after decadence on your poor stomach, would be a Christmas miracle, and getting creative with drinks, in particular, could be the answer.

Continue reading...

November 20th 2019, 6:55 am

Man sues Burger King for cooking vegan burger and meat on same grill

Life and style | The Guardian

Phillip Williams argues he wouldn’t have bought the burger if he’d known it was ‘covered in meat by-products’

When Burger King announced the Impossible Whopper (a vegan alternative to their bestselling burger), they did so with the tagline: “100% Whopper, 0% Beef.”

Turns out, the statement may have been misleading. At least, that’s what customer Phillip Williams, who is vegan, has claimed in a lawsuit filed against the fast-food giant in south Florida on Monday.

Continue reading...

November 20th 2019, 5:55 am

'Pop art iconographs': Supreme skateboards go under hammer

Life and style | The Guardian

Decks produced with Damien Hirst and Jeff Koons among those up for sale in New York

Skateboards from the New York-based brand Supreme will go under the hammer at Christie’s next week and have been compared to the work of Marcel Duchamp and Andy Warhol.

The sale includes skateboard decks produced in collaboration with contemporary artists such as Damien Hirst and Jeff Koons.

Continue reading...

November 20th 2019, 5:55 am

World's first printed Christmas card goes on display at Dickens museum

Life and style | The Guardian

Printed in 1843, the hand-coloured card originally sold for one shilling and shaped the popular tradition

The world’s first printed Christmas card, an artwork created in 1843 that went on to spawn a global industry, has gone on show at the Charles Dickens Museum in London.

Designed by Henry Cole and illustrated by John Callcott Horsley, in the same year that Dickens’ A Christmas Carol was published, the hand-coloured card shows a family gathered around a table enjoying a glass of wine with a message: “A merry Christmas and a happy new year to you.”

Continue reading...

November 20th 2019, 5:55 am

Not too shabby: what will it take to make secondhand clothes mainstream?

Life and style | The Guardian

Through mending, lending and adopting a fast-fashion ethos, secondhand shopping is slowly shaking off its stigma in Australia

When it comes to fashion, we didn’t always have a fetish for newness.

Just ask historian Robyn Annear. The way she tells it in her new book, Nothing New: A History of Second-Hand, the Industrial Revolution changed everything. Before then most of humanity wore secondhand. “There was a limited amount of stuff to go around,” she says.

Continue reading...

November 20th 2019, 5:55 am

The royal treatment: the majestic role of fashion in The Crown

Life and style | The Guardian

By recreating the royals’ outfits and ramping up the glamour, the hit TV drama constantly blurs the line between fact and fiction. That is what makes the show so compelling

All publicity is good publicity, they say, but the royal family is the exception that proves that rule. And recent television coverage of the royals has been – to put it mildly – a mixed bag. The new series of The Crown launched on Netflix within hours of that Prince Andrew interview. One was dependably glorious, which is precisely what royalty is supposed to be. The other was, well, a car crash seems to be the go-to analogy, although I can’t help feeling car crashes are slightly bad-taste imagery when it comes to describing royal PR disasters.

The upshot of all this is that the third series of The Crown will be required to do more heavy lifting than the previous two, in making us fall in love with it – a burden that falls in large part upon the wardrobe department. Clothes, jewellery, hair and makeup are an essential part of The Crown. From the beginning, the series has made the royals more beautiful and more glamorous than their real-life counterparts, and invited us to fall under their spell. The Crown has given the senior royals a newly glittering backstory: here, we see the Queen a spirited young beauty; Prince Philip golden-haired and square-jawed.

Continue reading...

November 20th 2019, 1:03 am

A poo facial mask – smaller pores, yes, but do you really want faeces on your face?

Life and style | The Guardian

Face masks made of nightingale faeces, used in Japan for centuries, are currently resurgent in western salons. But what are the results like?

I am standing in the bathroom with poo all over my face. Let me explain. Face masks made of nightingale faeces, used by elite Japanese women for centuries, are one of the stranger beautifying techniques currently resurgent in western salons. I’m giving the cheaper, at-home version a try, to see if there’s anything in it.

Do nightingales shoot magic out of their cloacas? More to the point, who wants to be young for ever if it means spending eternity in the bathroom with poo all over your face?

Continue reading...

November 19th 2019, 7:30 am

Mandy Moore: ‘There’s much more scrutiny now. You’re seen from all angles’

Life and style | The Guardian

The actor on sequins, red-carpet disco fun, denim dresses and fast-forwarding her age in This Is Us

I don’t tend to overthink what to wear to awards shows, but this felt like a momentous occasion. It was the first time I’d been nominated for an Emmy and I wanted to feel like the very best version of myself. I met with the designer Brandon Maxwell two weeks before the awards. He had just had his spring show and we talked about several ideas. He said: “Let me just make all of them, and you can mix and match.” So on the day I wore one version of this outfit to the ceremony, and then a slightly different version to the afterparty.

When I first started out [in my career], social media wasn’t a thing. There’s so much more scrutiny now – you’re going to be seen from all angles at all times. It also means that [clothes] have to stand the test of time because the pictures are going to be out there for ever. Looking back 20 years ago, not all my outfit, hair and makeup choices have held up very well – but I never regret them because I always felt great in the moment. Nowadays, I like to have fun and stretch the creative limits of a red carpet – so one day I might wear a suit, one day a bodycon dress, one day 60s blue eyeshadow and sequins, and look like a disco ball!

Continue reading...

November 19th 2019, 7:19 am

The love bubble: ten mistakes to avoid in a new romance

Life and style | The Guardian

The early days of a relationship can be blissful but fraught. Experts weigh in on the most common pitfalls – from coming on too strong to not establishing clear boundaries

Those early days of a relationship often pass in a fog of bliss. Texts from friends go unreturned; entire weekends are lost in bed. But many relationships crumble by the three-month mark – when you start to see the other person’s flaws, but before the partnership becomes a solid, defined entity. If you can weather the three-month point, those early days will set the tone for your future relationship. What are the common mistakes people make at the start of relationships – and how can you avoid them? The experts weigh in.

Continue reading...

November 19th 2019, 7:19 am

You're not alone: how to survive your horrible boss

Life and style | The Guardian

Working under a bully can do real damage to your mental health. But there are ways to protect yourself

In hindsight, Zoe regrets not heeding the red flags she noticed when interviewing for the office job she held for a year. “The CEO joked around a little bit inappropriately,” she recalls, “Also, I heard him yelling in his office when I was waiting for my interview to begin.”

Soon after she was hired, Zoe (whose name has been changed to protect her professionally) realized her boss hadn’t just been having a bad day; he was a bully and a big-time yeller.

Continue reading...

November 19th 2019, 5:04 am

My girlfriend is a virgin – can our sexless relationship survive?

Life and style | The Guardian

She is not comfortable with physical contact, and I don’t want to lose what we have

I’m a 36-year-old man. I have been in a relationship for a year, and love my girlfriend. But she is a virgin, and says she is not sure she ever wants to have sex. She is not comfortable with physical contact. I don’t want to lose what we have. I don’t want to make her uncomfortable by asking her to do things that she isn’t happy with. Is there a way of being physically satisfied in a sexless relationship?

It is not unusual for someone who has never made love with another person to feel unsure, anxious or even afraid of sex. Patience is vital. But if you feel sexual expression within a relationship is really important then you will have to explain that to her and address this together. An ideal starting point would be to help her to feel safe enough to try to explain exactly why she lacks sexual interest. Some reasons could be a fear of pregnancy, lack of education about sexual behaviour, previous relationship problems or lack of attraction.

Continue reading...

November 19th 2019, 3:15 am

The rise of jobstoppers: should face tattoos be banned?

Life and style | The Guardian

Tattoo artists want to raise the legal age limit for facial inkings from 18 to 21, as they could harm young people’s career prospects

Name: Face tattoos.

Age: They were outlawed by the Roman emperor Constantine in AD316, so older than that.

Continue reading...

November 18th 2019, 12:05 pm

How we met: 'As a hardcore single person, I now know it’s never too late'

Life and style | The Guardian

Linda Rabben, an associate research professor, and John Eckenrode, a retired counsellor at an organisation for homeless people, live in Washington DC

Linda and John had been single for virtually their entire adult lives when they met in 2008; Linda was 60 and John was 56. Linda’s cat had died shortly before. “I decided I needed another partner, and this time I would try for a human,” she says. “I had tried answering personals ads before, but they had been disastrous for the most part. I thought: ‘I’ll try one more time and that will be it.’”

She joined the Washington Post’s online dating site. John was doing the same, cajoled by a younger colleague at the soup kitchen where he worked as a counsellor. “I was putting in an average of 60 hours a week, so it didn’t make for a lot of time to have a social life,” he says. “She was not very impressed, and she sat me down in front of the computer screen, and she said: ‘We’re going to do this.’”

Continue reading...

November 18th 2019, 11:21 am

More fathers are taking paternity leave, but mothers are still doing all the work

Life and style | The Guardian

A survey found 62% of fathers took time off for their newborn, but women saw a greater damage to future job prospects

Attitudes towards paternity leave have drastically changed in America in the last five years as more fathers feel comfortable taking extended time off, but gender stereotypes persist when it comes to career prospects and the home, according to a new study of working parents.

Research by the Boston College Center for Work & Family, which surveyed new parents at four large US companies who were eligible for at least 6 weeks paid parental leave, found that 81% of the 1,240 employees surveyed said the notion of fathers taking leave has become more acceptable.

Continue reading...

November 18th 2019, 9:17 am

Pulp fabric: everything you need to know about lyocell

Life and style | The Guardian

It’s got a scientific name and a heavenly silkiness – but is the material that is showing up everywhere, from catwalks to your wardrobe, really as sustainable as we are led to believe?

First produced commercially in Mobile, Alabama almost 30 years ago, lyocell is currently enjoying a lot of attention as a plant-based fibre used for clothing. Both luxury and high street labels are investing in the buttery-soft textile: Swiss loungewear brand Hanro recently released a shirt made of 100% lyocell, London label Mother of Pearl uses it and Zara, Mango and H&M have also placed their bets on it. Selfridges calls it a “miracle fabric”. So what exactly is it, and is it really that good?

Continue reading...

November 18th 2019, 8:34 am

Where's the beef? The chefs creating plant-based meat alternatives

Life and style | The Guardian

From burgers to sausages, meat-free alternatives are gaining shelf space. Jason Deans meets Derek Sarno, the vegan chef creating them

From roasts to ready meals, barbecues to takeaways, the meat we eat might be changing. The future? Decidedly higher in veg, if the numbers are to be believed.

Sales of meat-free food in the UK reached £740m in 2018, market research firm Mintel estimates – still just a fraction of the £190bn annual food and grocery retail sector. However, Mintel is forecasting rapid growth, up 44% to £1.1bn by 2023. It also reports that the 16% of new food product launches last year were vegan or had no animal ingredients, doubling from 8% in 2015.

Continue reading...

November 18th 2019, 7:48 am

I could lift more than I weighed – and loved it. But an injury gave me a much healthier perspective

Life and style | The Guardian

I wanted to prove I could compete with the men in the weights room. A slipped disc made me reassess my attitude to extreme accomplishments

I was never good at PE at school, nor interested in getting good at it. Somehow, I knew the best way to endure it was to be enthusiastically bad, overestimating my ability for a laugh or begrudging respect from a teacher. I would voluntarily do butterfly against the county swimming champions, purely because I found it funny.

Secretly, maybe, I wished I was naturally sporty. In my early 20s, I had more important things to do than fitness (drinking and watching Mad Men), but by 25, I realised it was time to get moving. I tried running and the gym. Then, with the help of a powerfully shredded trainer, I discovered weightlifting.

Continue reading...

November 18th 2019, 5:17 am

Photographer Terry O'Neill: a life in pictures

Life and style | The Guardian

Terry O’Neill helped capture an era of cultural and social revolution in Britain. Here is a selection of some of his images of stars from film, music and fashion

Continue reading...

November 17th 2019, 1:55 pm

Five ways to clean your home naturally

Life and style | The Guardian

Shop-bought cleaning products can be harmful to the environment and your health. Homemade alternatives, made with products such as lemon and vinegar, can tackle the toughest of jobs Continue reading...

November 17th 2019, 12:05 pm

How to remove makeup properly

Life and style | The Guardian

It’s time to ditch the remover wipes and switch to gentler, kinder techniques for taking off mascara and cleaning your pores

Makeup remover wipes are not only bad for the environment – they can also damage your skin. While they seem like a quick fix, their material can be abrasive and their harsh ingredients often strip the skin of its natural oils, leading to sensitivity and breakouts.

To remove your makeup properly, you should start with the delicate skin around the eyes. Instead of wipes, saturate three cotton discs with a cleanser specifically designed for the eye area, cutting one pad in half to place under each eye. Don’t try to rub off your mascara straight away. Instead, hold the cotton pads on each eye for 60 seconds to allow the makeup to break down before gently wiping it off.

Continue reading...

November 17th 2019, 10:34 am

Simon Hopkinson’s Christmas lunch recipes

Life and style | The Guardian

Roast goose stuffed with mashed potato, onions a la monegasque and marsala custards – the year’s biggest meal sorted

“Nothing like a nice festive sherry to fortify the taste buds,” says Auntie Jean, while quietly drinking a pre-prandial Christmas amontillado. This 11-year old, meanwhile, is helping to trim the sprouts by the sink with Dad, who mutters aside that he’ll soon be pouring himself a gin and French once the bread sauce is put to simmer. I always thought that Dad’s drink was absolute filth: half a tumbler of gin, with the remaining volume topped up with Noilly Prat. No ice. No lemon. And then he will probably sneak in a quick top-up while Mum, my brother, Auntie Jean and I are in the sitting room watching the Queen. All that having been said, our Christmas Day feast was always, but always, quite brilliant.

Continue reading...

November 17th 2019, 10:34 am

Britain’s top 10 coastal retreats

Life and style | The Guardian

These winter winners offer great stays for an off-season break – of windswept walks or just being cosy – and feature lighthouses, inns, forts and crofters’ cottages

In good weather, you can see 20 miles in either direction: to the left, the white stone of Portland; to the right, Golden Cap and the distant slopes of Devon. Running between them is Chesil Beach, the setting made famous by Ian McEwan’s novel-turned film. The National Trust has restored this peaceful stone cottage overlooking the sea. There’s a spacious master bedroom on the first floor and another double in the attic. The sitting room has a charming inglenook fireplace.

Continue reading...

November 17th 2019, 10:34 am

Quick-fix saving: how to set aside extra money for Christmas

Life and style | The Guardian

It’s late November, but there’s still time to save for the festive season. Here’s a complete guide to how to do it – whether sharing, swapping or shopping around

Selfridge’s may have opened its Christmas shop in July, but most of us are only just starting to think seriously about the festive season. Hot on the heels of working out how you plan to spend Christmas comes the realisation of how much you plan to spend. Presents, food and trips out swiftly add up.

Of course, there are lots of ways to celebrate that do not require a big outlay. But if there are things you know you want to do or buy, and your budget is not limitless, some quick-fix savings will help.

Continue reading...

November 17th 2019, 10:34 am

Nigel Slater’s mushroom and dill tart and chocolate chip cake recipes

Life and style | The Guardian

Bake a tart and a swirl of cakes and warm up your home this winter

I’ve been spending too much time away from home. (You could measure my life in tubs of instant porridge eaten on trains and sandwich-shop lunches hastily devoured between meetings.) Of course, when I say away from home, I really mean away from my kitchen.

So, I stole two days off this week, time enough to get the house back to order, plant some spring bulbs for the pots on the steps and make my kitchen feel loved again. Most of all, I baked. My life feels restored with a cake in the oven, even more so when that cake is accompanied by a tart of mushrooms and herbs, its face turning golden as it cooks. Suddenly, the room is warm, the oven is aglow and the place feels like home again. Cake, anyone?

Continue reading...

November 17th 2019, 7:34 am

Christmas gift ideas for food lovers 2019

Life and style | The Guardian

From stocking fillers to hampers, great Christmas presents for foodies, selected by Observer Food Monthly

Honey & Spice biscuits

Continue reading...

November 17th 2019, 7:04 am

Sounding it out: ‘Listening to white noise put my life back on track’

Life and style | The Guardian

Megan Nolan was searching for a way to switch off the stresses of modern life. Then she discovered white noise. Here, she charts how the flat frequencies helped her cope

Late last year Spotify presented me with my Top 100 most listened to tracks of 2018 and, as ever when I’m presented with some unknown version of myself, I couldn’t wait to analyse it. Like a dog returning to its vomit, nothing fascinates me more than my own alien excretions. I could spend the rest of my life contorting my brain to view tagged pictures of myself, attempting to understand how others see me. But there it was, above the other great heroes of my year, Leonard Cohen and Ariana Grande. In the number one spot was White Noise. Not just White Noise – “White Noise For Babies”. I had listened to nothing all year as much as I had listened to flat soundscapes designed to soothe infants.

I first came to white noise shortly after I moved to London from Dublin. I left Ireland in a hurry, with no good plans in place, no real reason to have come, and so lived for two years in a constant stressful flux. I worked temp jobs, I sub-let my bedroom, I relied on the generosity of my best friend to top up my Oyster card when I had nothing left. I felt flayed. London left nothing to the imagination.

Continue reading...

November 17th 2019, 5:17 am

Festive sandwiches, bath bombs and other seasonal traditions | Eva Wiseman

Life and style | The Guardian

It’s not only the frosty mornings and dark nights that let you know winter is here. There’s also the cranberry sandwiches, cheery cups and frothing baths…

In my hand I hold a bath bomb. It is pink and rough, unglazed, its colour and consistency reminiscent of eczema, its smell that of 15 girls entering a limo. If I drop it into the water, which is running hotly in the room next door, it will dissolve into a million sharp grains, infecting the bath with a misty pinkness, like a nostalgic effect on a VHS camera. This bomb, a Christmas gift from a forgotten family member, has travelled with me at the bottom of a washbag through three house moves, and today is the day I will finally allow it to fulfil its wet destiny.

I bathe seasonally, when the weather turns. There are two ways to measure the beginning of winter – one is to look out of the window in the morning and gauge the frost levels on a neighbour’s windscreen, the other is to walk down the high street to monitor festive limited editions.

Continue reading...

November 17th 2019, 5:04 am

Why mushroom-picking is the best form of mindfulness

Life and style | The Guardian

From the concentration of looking for them and the care of picking them to the delight of eating them, mushroom foraging is a balm for life

In her new book, The Way Through the Woods, the Norwegian-Malaysian writer Long Litt Woon describes the various sensory pleasures that are involved in the gathering of mushrooms: the beguiling way they yield to the human hand; their different textures, whether velvety or hairy, rubbery or powdery; even the noises they make (some pop when snapped). Above all, there are the different ways that they smell. The prince mushroom comes with top notes of marzipan. The wood blewit brings to mind burnt rubber. The common stinkhorn emits the sweet aroma of rotting flesh.

Smell plays a vital role in a mushroom’s popularity as food – though as Loon notes, this isn’t always straightforward. Different cultures favour different smells. When the matsutake or pine mushroom was discovered by a Norwegian mycologist in 1905, it was given the name Tricholoma nauseosa on the grounds that its odour was unpleasant (the American mycologist David Arora has since described it as being reminiscent of dirty socks). In Japan, however, where those who pick it wear white gloves and there are poems describing its virtues that date from 759 BC, it is considered to smell divine – which is why, in 1999, when it was discovered that T. nauseosa and the Japanese pine mushroom are the same species, people there lobbied for the right to rename it T. matsutake (the Japanese for pine mushroom).

Continue reading...

November 17th 2019, 5:04 am

Sunday with Gemma Collins: ‘I probably haven’t made my own bed for 10 years’

Life and style | The Guardian

The Towie star on hot milk, perfect spuds and a clean duvet cover

What’s for breakfast? There’s nothing better than cornflakes with hot milk. It’s my Sunday treat. They taste so much better when the cornflakes have gone all squidgy. The hot milk relaxes me, so I normally have a little snooze after.

What were Sundays like growing up? They were lovely. We’d get up. My dad would clean the car. No one would rush around. And we’d always have a family roast around 3pm.

Continue reading...

November 17th 2019, 2:29 am

Our roof terrace garden is a calm, healing space | Allan Jenkins

Life and style | The Guardian

We wrap up, sip tea – or wine – and wait for brighter days

The plot is close to hibernation, hunkered like a hedgehog, though not yet as sleepy. I am about to sow broad beans. I have moved the kales from their nursery beds. I stand and watch the amaranth fall. I pick kale and chard for midweek suppers, a couple of autumn carrots. I guard the puntarelle. But there is no denying winter now, so this week a few more thoughts on caring for flowers in pots.

When we first came to our home, the roof terrace was an abandoned bike yard – old cycles for almost every age, bits of retired furniture, its floor tiled in asbestos. No grass, no soil, but our own outside space.

Continue reading...

November 17th 2019, 2:29 am

Crowning glory: the easy way to party hair | Funmi Fetto

Life and style | The Guardian

Elevate your everyday look with fancy hair wear

The problem with buying into the arguably archaic concept of “party hair” is you’re left with hair too done, too ageing and too far removed from how you actually wear it when normal service resumes. Still, if you are sold on party hair at least make it modern, as per the AW19 Chanel show. Hair accessories are all the rage and wearing them is ridiculously simple. Take a slightly elevated version of your day-to-day hair, add a hairband, bow or barrette and voilà!

1. Bumble and Bumble Invisible Oil £35, lookfantastic.co.uk
2. Double star row metal headband £12.50, topshop.com
3. Frédéric Malle Portrait of a Lady Hair Mist £128, libertylondon.com
4. Chanel hair slide £610, chanel.com
5. Simone Rocha faux pearl hair slide £75, net-a-porter.com
6. Jennifer Behr Marabella Swarovski crystal embellished hair clip £249.60, net-a-porter.com

Continue reading...

November 17th 2019, 1:59 am

I love my son more than my daughter, but don’t know why | Dear Mariella

Life and style | The Guardian

It’s important to find the reasons, says Mariella Frostrup. Look back to when you were pregnant or soon after your daughter was born for clues

The dilemma I’m a mother to a girl (four) and a boy (two) and I love my son more than my daughter. I know it’s common to love one child more than another, but what bothers me is that my daughter isn’t loved as much as she deserves, and not nearly as much as I would like to love her. I do feel love for her, I’m protective of her and her happiness, and her health and wellbeing are so important to me, but something is missing and I don’t know how to achieve it, or why it’s happened. When she was born, it took me several weeks to make a meaningful emotional connection with her – unlike with her brother, where it formed as soon as he was put in my arms. I feel like the nature of my relationship with both of them was forever formed right there and then. I hope that I’m wrong. It makes me feel guilty. She’s a wonderful, kind, intelligent and funny girl that I want to love, but something is blocking my feelings towards her. It breaks my heart. I make an effort to spend one-on-one quality time with her, which we enjoy, but it doesn’t help.

Mariella replies Bravo for your honesty. It’s not easy to accept that your feelings for your children differ and it’s equally challenging to admit it publicly in these censorious times – not that you have anything to be ashamed of. As you say, there are plenty of parents with similar qualms. I remember, before my second child was born, being terrified I wouldn’t have enough room in my heart for another baby, that somehow my daughter had used up all my emotional bandwidth. When I first laid eyes on my son and found my heart had expanded in that instant to encompass him I was surprised, relieved and reminded that biology is a miraculous thing.

Continue reading...

November 17th 2019, 1:11 am

Live Seafood, Manchester: ‘A parade of the best and freshest Chinese dishes’ – restaurant review

Life and style | The Guardian

The Chinese dishes here are so fresh that you can go eyeball to eyeball with them first

Live Seafood, 163 Ashton Old Road, Manchester M11 3WU (07894 062 214). Seafood prices vary depending upon choices and weight, but roughly £10-£25

This week’s restaurant is not a secret. Many of Manchester’s Chinese restaurateurs will know exactly where it is: on a scuffed drag, a mile or so east of Manchester Piccadilly station, overlooking wasteground apparently untouched by thoughts of urban regeneration. That doesn’t stop Live Seafood being obscure. And utterly, delightfully nuts. It was once a red brick boozer called the Seven Stars, but now has an extension and a lot of signage, plastered with giant images of lobsters, king crabs and shiny fish. Occasionally the building is hung with fairy lights. They love a fairy light at Live Seafood.

Continue reading...

November 17th 2019, 1:11 am

Make it a vintage night: eco partywear

Life and style | The Guardian

Borrow, embellish, reuse, upcycle… Looking great doesn’t have to cost the earth

Newness is overrated. The most sustainable thing to wear to a party is the thing you already own. So, shop your wardrobe. “Party wear is usually not worn very often, so do you really have to buy something new?” asks personal stylist Anna Berkeley (annaberkeley.com). “And unless you’re a clinical minimalist, you might have overlooked something. When I’m doing wardrobe clearouts with clients they’re constantly saying, ‘Oh, I forgot about that!’” And if there’s something you are not wearing, is it because it needs adjusting? “I have a black Tibi dress that is a great fit, but it’s not quite the right length on my leg, so I’m going to get a tailor to add a feather trim to the bottom,” says Berkeley.

Steph Stevens, a fashion editor and stylist whose clients include Alexa Chung, recently launched a consultancy service specialising in archive clothing that she sells or rents, with inspiration pictures on her Instagram feed @happydays_stephstevens. One of her tips for parties is tying a coloured ribbon around a shirt collar. “I like slightly unusual colours – my favourite is mint green, which looks great with white or black.” She also suggests taking your silk pyjamas out for the night. “They have to be a decent pair, but you can split them up so that you get two looks for the price of one. Wear the trousers with a dressy shoe, the shirt with a blazer and jeans.” And it doesn’t have to be all about the clothes. “A good red matt lipstick can up the tempo of an outfit.” She likes Glossier’s Generation G sheer matte in Zip.

Continue reading...

November 16th 2019, 7:09 pm

The edit... The best womenswear party pieces – in pictures

Life and style | The Guardian

Shimmer your way through the party season in chiffon and sequins, and invest in statement accessories to instantly elevate your look

Continue reading...

November 16th 2019, 6:53 pm

The edit... The best menswear party pieces – in pictures

Life and style | The Guardian

Pair animal prints and quirky colours with classic trousers and accessories for a look that will stay fresh all season long

Continue reading...

November 16th 2019, 6:53 pm

Bored with white? Use paint with personality in your home

Life and style | The Guardian

A dash of rhubarb, a bright yellow wall or a whole room painted orange? Swap safe neutrals for bold hues and feel your mood lift

The feature wall – that seemingly bold decorative decision to paint one wall in the room a stand-out colour – is dead. Colour is now spreading through our homes, up staircases, across woodwork and ceilings, filling in neutral spaces with rhubarb, verdigris green, aubergine and orange. Is it a terrifying trend we’ll all pay for in gallons of undercoat, or does this colour craving signify something else?

“There’s been a seismic shift in how we’re thinking about colour,” says Farrow & Ball’s long-standing colour curator, Joa Studholme. “I am convinced the rise of bold colour comes down to the fact that the world is in such a mess. We want to go home and have colours that nourish us, that give us a hug. Pure white walls simply don’t do that. They don’t look after you.”

Continue reading...

November 16th 2019, 11:18 am

The future is fluid as labels sign up for gender-free fashion

Life and style | The Guardian

Pop stars and designers drive a growing trend for non-binary outfits

When two of the biggest pop stars on the planet sign up to a fashion movement, you know something must be afoot. On Wednesday, Rihanna posted a photo of herself to her 76.8 million followers on Instagram wearing a T-shirt by London-based fashion label Art School. Last month, Harry Styles put out his video for Lights Up in which he wears a blue silk moire suit designed by long-time collaborator Harris Reed.

Both Art School and Harris Reed identify themselves as non-binary labels. On Instagram, Art School defines itself as “a non-binary queer luxury label”, while Harris Reed is “fighting for the beauty of fluidity”. Despite there being a long history of LGBTQI designers working in fashion (McQueen and Lagerfeld among the most famous), they have notably been cis-identifying, white men. The label of “non-binary” in fashion is new (Collins recently announced it was adding “non-binary” to its dictionaries) and pertinent to a younger generation where more than one in 10 millennials identify as transgender or gender non-conforming. There are a clutch of new fashion labels, from One DNA to Riley Studio, that offer the same clothes to everyone, and where dividing your fashion into gendered lines feels out-of-date.

Continue reading...

November 16th 2019, 10:18 am

A psychedelic retreat proves a healing trip

Life and style | The Guardian

Exploring the therapeutic benefits of magic mushrooms at a ceremony in Amsterdam

I’m at a weekend retreat in a converted church near Amsterdam. There is soft, celestial music playing and I’m sipping fresh herbal tea while discussing my hopes and fears for tomorrow’s “ceremony”, which is retreat parlance for a psychedelic trip. Consuming the truffle parts of magic mushrooms is permitted in the Netherlands and my nine fellow guests and I will be eating a variety called Dragon’s Dynamite. We’re not taking recreational drugs, but rather using psychedelics as self-exploratory and therapeutic “plant medicine”. Welcome to the age of the psychedelic retreat.

Synthesis opened its doors in April 2018. It was co-founded by Martijn Schirp, a former poker player who found salvation through psychedelics. “I had my first mushroom trip nine years ago and that changed my life,” he says. “I was walking through this forest and it was so peaceful, it was like a fairy tale. I felt this huge self-critical voice lift off me.” He believes he’d still be estranged from his father if it wasn’t for the perspective psychedelics have given him. His entrepreneurial mind saw that what was missing was a retreat with “medical supervision, private one-to-one coaching and professional standards in a modern context”.

Continue reading...

November 16th 2019, 10:18 am

Harvey Keitel: ‘I’ve never played a violent character’

Life and style | The Guardian

The actor, 80, on childhood stuttering, not doing Twitter, keeping his powers and filming The Irishman

Success isn’t about awards. Success is continuity, a process of discovery. I’ve been very lucky to be a part of movies that were widely appreciated, but there are lesser known movies I’m just as proud of.

A lot of people ask me why I’m always playing violent characters. I feel I’ve never played a violent character; I’ve played characters that were in deep conflict, despair and chaos.

Continue reading...

November 16th 2019, 9:45 am

‘I have a daughter to bring up and I’m struggling to survive’

Life and style | The Guardian

Jason Cordingley, 41, on how he has battled to make ends meet and now hopes to move into teaching

Name: Jason Cordingley
Age: 38
Income: Occasional part -time casual work plus rent support
Occupation: Student

I’ve lived all over the country but the only place I’ve really struggled to find work is Plymouth. I moved from Brighton more than a year ago after my ex moved here with our daughter. I have a decent CV with lots of experience and qualifications in areas like accountancy and graphic design but they don’t seem to be in demand here. This year I’ve had three jobs: a maternity cover PA role which ended when she returned early; an admin assistant job that went from temp to permanent but I was let go when their budget was cut; and cleaning bird mess off the warships in the dockyards. I apply for lots of jobs but am often told I’m overqualified and so they don’t take me on.

From Christmas to May this year I was on universal credit and it was a nightmare. I received £406 a month towards rent but my accommodation at the time was £750 as I was living in a two-bedroom flat so my daughter could come and stay. I was left out of pocket. I hoped I wouldn’t be out of work for too long but in the end I had to move into a cheaper place. Now I’m stuck in a shared house, which isn’t exactly a great environment for my daughter. The situation is far from ideal. But at £450 including bills, at least the rent here is more affordable.

Continue reading...

November 16th 2019, 8:45 am

How to grow tradescantia | Alys Fowler

Life and style | The Guardian

A spiderwort was my first love and we’re still going strong

When I was about 16, my biology teacher showed me a tradescantia cell under a microscope. For the life of me I can’t remember what we were looking at: stomata or the effects of plasmolysis, perhaps? I just remember looking up from the minute world of cells in this simple plant and falling headlong in love. Not long after that I took over the biology department greenhouse and the rest, as they say, is history.

If I was rewriting my past, I’d insert an orchid or a carnivorous plant, but instead I chose the one that the biology department couldn’t kill. And for that reason, I’d recommend it to you, too.

Continue reading...

November 16th 2019, 6:28 am

'I find it dramatic': inside the all-blue home of architect Sharon Toong

Life and style | The Guardian

An interior designer’s flat is a showcase for the dramatic, bold blues she believes are here to stay

From dark lead to chalky white, grey has hogged our walls for years. Not any more. “I feel it’s had its day,” says architect and interior designer Sharon Toong. “I’m drawn to blue, especially the darker shades.” Indeed, moody blue paints – all similar but slightly different – are used throughout this two-bedroom flat: in the main bedroom, the study, an internal courtyard, her baby daughter’s room, and the kitchen cabinets. The hall is alive with blue banana leaves, vines and tropical palms, courtesy of design team House of Hackney.

This and the master bedroom are naturally dark spaces, so Toong decided to work that to her advantage. “There was no getting around the fact that the corridor was long and windowless, so I chose that bold, enveloping wallpaper,” she says. “It brings you out into the flat’s lighter, brighter areas, with glimpses of foliage in garden beyond. A deep blue shade on the walls and ceiling makes a room feel very cocooning.”

Continue reading...

November 16th 2019, 6:28 am

A letter to… our neighbours with a baby

Life and style | The Guardian

‘A single layer of brick was our only protection from months of nightly screaming’: the letter you always wanted to write

It’s been three years, and your child is now a lively and boisterous toddler. I hear her shouting with glee and running around until there is a crash, and then I hear your voices through our shared walls, scolding or soothing depending on the mishap. I don’t doubt you’re good parents. There seems to be a lot of love in your household.

My wife and I are childless through choice, but we have never judged anyone’s decision to become parents. This was tested to the limit when we moved in next door to you, only a few days before your daughter was born.

Continue reading...

November 16th 2019, 5:28 am

The critical drubbing for Will Self’s book shows there’s a subtle art to memoir | Hadley Freeman

Life and style | The Guardian

A common flaw is forgetting you’re supposed to be writing for the reader’s pleasure, not yours

I hadn’t realised people were so keen to see Will Self get a drubbing until the reviews came out for his memoir – titled with characteristic perversity, Will, as opposed to the more obviously memoir-ish Self. To be honest, I’d never had strong feelings one way or the other, as Self struck me as an author for people who bang on about Kerouac and Burroughs; given that my favourite writer is Nora Ephron, we were never going to be literary soulmates. But I enjoy his television appearances, and I’m glad TV producers have found someone other than Stephen Fry to fill the public intellectual role. Yet, for the past month, every time an especially vicious review has been published, my phone has lit up with tweets.

People always enjoy a critical savaging, and there’s satisfaction in seeing a smarty-pants taken down a peg. Another reason is his ex-wife, the late and much-loved journalist Deborah Orr, who was a friend of mine. Orr was not shy in sharing her less-than-benevolent feelings towards her ex-husband on her since-deleted Twitter feed, and, as it happens, she also has a memoir coming out next year, Motherwell, already the subject of much advance praise. But tempting as it may be to contrast Orr’s and Self’s memoirs, a more instructive comparison is with the novelist Edward St Aubyn.

Continue reading...

November 16th 2019, 4:56 am

My Jamaican dad was an RAF hero. Why did no one believe me?

Life and style | The Guardian

My Welsh mother met my father during the war. From childhood, I have grown to dread the question: ‘Where are you from?’

I was in primary school the first time it happened. The boy who sat at the desk to my right – the one who used to pinch my arm whenever the teacher’s back was turned – finished talking about his father’s war experience of heat and flies and deserts while driving tanks across Egypt, and looked at me smugly as if to say, “Beat that.” It was my turn to describe my father’s contribution to the war effort. I stated clearly that my father served in the RAF. On the piano at home stood a photograph of a young man in RAF uniform, with an enigmatic smile, head tilted at a slightly rakish and daredevil angle, holding a pipe in his hand. In my eyes he was the epitome of wartime British heroism.

Before I could describe the photograph, I was interrupted by the teacher who told me to sit and listen carefully. I sat. The entire class was stunned. Silenced by her anger, they stared at me, the culprit, as the teacher issued a warning about the dire consequences of telling lies. She insisted that there were no “coloured” people in Britain during the war, that no coloured people served in any of the armed services, and certainly not in the RAF, the most elite branch of the British military.

Continue reading...

November 16th 2019, 4:56 am

George Takei: ‘My dream dinner party? My colleagues from Star Trek, with one exception’

Life and style | The Guardian

The actor on his wartime internment, the struggle for a same-sex marriage, and how his pecs lost the battle with gravity

Born in California to Japanese-American parents, George Takei, 82, spent his childhood in US internment camps. From 1966 he played Sulu in the Star Trek television series and films. In 2015 he told the story of his family’s wartime incarceration in the Broadway musical Allegiance, and this year he published the graphic memoir They Called Us Enemy. He lives in Los Angeles with his husband.

When were you happiest?
When Brad and I got married. We had to struggle for it. It involved a nationwide speaking tour, lobbying Congress and campaigning intensely. We were the first couple to get our marriage licence in West Hollywood.

Continue reading...

November 16th 2019, 4:56 am

How we live together: the foster family

Life and style | The Guardian

I moved in with Pearl when I was 15, and I was pretty antisocial. She was so warm and patient, and she cared

I started fostering in 2006 and it’s one of the most rewarding things I have done; getting young people to believe in themselves. I have fostered 10 young people through the charity Tact. One stayed with me for four years until he went off to university.

Continue reading...

November 16th 2019, 4:56 am

Naomi Campbell: ‘I will not be held hostage to my past’

Life and style | The Guardian

The supermodel opens up about friends, enemies, taking on the tabloids – and fashion’s new world order

It’s no secret that Naomi Campbell doesn’t like interviews. After 33 years in the business, and a string of tabloid-baiting moments, the model has acquired a reputation for being surly, formidable, downright difficult. Our original meeting is cancelled an hour or so before we are due to meet – Campbell cites “terrific illness” – but a promise is made to reschedule, with the possibility that she might be free over the weekend. Or that we might end up speaking by phone. But then the text arrives: we are on, for Sunday at 4pm. Give or take an hour, Campbell keeps to her word. Her publicist and I chat in the lobby of The Dorchester hotel in London, while I mentally prepare for the full force of her legendary froideur.

It is almost alarming, then, to find Campbell making jokes in a suite at the hotel, where she is alone, resting an injured leg on the sofa, smoking a cigarette, full of pussycat charm. At 49, she still looks otherworldly: a body, as Bono once put it, handmade by God, and skin so glowing it looks airbrushed. The era-defining cheekbones are framed by a sweep of immaculate hair; in the golden-hour light she looks luminous, dressed in a green chiffon Sacai jumpsuit and tractor sole Chelsea boots. She shows her publicist and me her leg: her knee is swollen like a melon, the result of tumbling on the stairs at an art party earlier in the week. She is worried that she won’t be able to fly if it doesn’t heal soon. “Clots are no joke,” she says. “[Doctors] stopped me from flying for six weeks two years ago. I do not want that again.”

Continue reading...

November 16th 2019, 4:56 am

Yotam Ottolenghi’s mushroom recipes

Life and style | The Guardian

Three super-savoury recipes that celebrate the unique flavour and texture of mushrooms: a traybake ragu, a spicy lasagne and a toast-topping confit of oyster mushrooms with a tangy aïoli

Mushrooms are little flavour sponges that will soak up just about anything you throw at them. Given the opportunity, they will also eagerly release their own extraordinary, savoury assets and meaty textures.

It takes a bit of know-how to unleash that potential, and those friendly fungi do need a bit of tough love every now and then. Tear, shred or mince them before subjecting them to searing heat and lots of oil both to stop them from going sloppy-squidgy and to ensure you get that full-on, delicious, mushroomy umami delight.

Continue reading...

November 16th 2019, 4:56 am

The best lip balms | Sali Hughes

Life and style | The Guardian

Seeking the holy grail of lip balms is a life’s work, and I take my calling seriously

The first step in researching this column was to empty every handbag, coat pocket, glove compartment and junk drawer to gather together 22 lip balms-in-progress. No, I am not exaggerating. I have tubes, sticks and pots of lip emollient everywhere, partly because one should always have one to hand (my husband and children frequently ask for lip balm, but never think to get a tube of their own), but also because seeking the holy grail of lip balms is a life’s work, and I take my calling seriously.

There are many different types, but in this instance I’m talking about the kind that, in just a day or two, can fix winter lips – those so shocked by the sudden cold snap and reignition of central heating (and associated snotty nose-blowing), that they crack, chap, split, redden and masochistically beg to be licked. The best products for the job contain both moisturising and hydrating ingredients, to treat the sore dryness and flaky dehydration at the same time.

Continue reading...

November 16th 2019, 3:09 am

I am haunted by the woman who piped up: ‘Can’t you just do your old stuff?’ | Romesh Ranganathan

Life and style | The Guardian

Starting a new tour is difficult, and this time my pre-show anxiety has been the worst ever

I am on tour right now, and I have been looking forward to being on the road for the longest time. The decision to tour was made a year and a half ago, and I have been working up the material ever since. (I guess what this means is that “the longest time” is actually 18 months.)

I read an interview a long time ago with one of my favourite rappers, Redman, where he said he was really worried about how his new album was going to be received. Until that point, I always had the impression that he did his thing, and that everybody else’s opinion was irrelevant to him. After reading the interview, he seemed slightly different, having expressed his vulnerability.

Continue reading...

November 16th 2019, 3:09 am

From scaredy-cat climber to next stop, the mountaintop | Zoe Williams

Life and style | The Guardian

Whenever I think about how high I am, my courage fails. Will top-roping make me bolder?

Fitness tips: top-rope climbing for beginners

When it comes to climbing, I’ve always been a boulder woman. There’s less equipment (just the shoes and your wit), you don’t need a partner and you don’t go as high. Then one day I remembered the point of it all: to climb outdoors, where you can lose yourself, and the air smells like grass rather than a cocktail of sweat. While you can boulder outdoors, if you’re not a very good climber you’ll get more of a challenge top-roping. And I’m not very good; whenever I think hard about how high I am, my courage fails.

Since top-roping has an insurance system, with one person stationed at the foot of the wall, acting as a counterweight, or belay, should you fall, I thought it might make me a little, er, bolder. I’ve already done the course, which lasts a day and qualifies you to use a wall without supervision (if you haven’t qualified to climb unsupervised, and nor has your belay, you will need to book a lesson).

Continue reading...

November 16th 2019, 2:24 am

Six of Europe’s best cities for vintage and retro shopping

Life and style | The Guardian

Locals share their go-to shops and markets for great-value items with bags of style and a tale to tell. Scroll down to see collectors’ favourite finds

Until recently, secondhand meant second-best for a country that remembered making do in tougher times, and only students and the city-dwelling vintage vanguard went to flea markets for fun. Now, old stuff is being viewed with a fresh eye. Bilbao is ahead of the curve – championing, repurposing and rendering cool the unique, pre-loved, quirky, crafted and durable.

Continue reading...

November 16th 2019, 2:24 am

Tim Dowling: I’ve killed my keyboard. Will the squirrel be next?

Life and style | The Guardian

‘Are you challenging me?’ I say to my enemy. ‘Because I’m in a mood to accept’

With a deadline looming and the morning fast evaporating, I am standing on a box in the cupboard where the washing machine is, looking for a can of plastic cleaning spray I bought two years ago.

“Ah-ha!” I say.

Continue reading...

November 16th 2019, 1:11 am

Blind date: ‘He asked if I’d want to go to a swingers’ party’

Life and style | The Guardian

Claire, 22, master’s student, meets Luke, 22, marketing executive

What were you hoping for?
Someone fun, friendly and easy to talk to. I try not to have high expectations to avoid being disappointed.

Continue reading...

November 16th 2019, 1:11 am

How we stay together: 'I think you should fight every day, resolve and move on'

Life and style | The Guardian

For Reid and Clare Froggatt, willingness to communicate saw them survive one of the most challenging ordeals parents can face

Names: Clare and Reid Froggatt
Years together: 34
Occupations: Teacher and business owner

When Clare and Reid Froggatt’s daughter Emma got married recently, she had a special note for her parents in her wedding speech. “She thanked us for loving each other,” says Clare, touched by her daughter’s gesture. “That’s the best [marriage] advice you can give [your children]: To model it.”

Continue reading...

November 15th 2019, 5:20 pm

My daughter has hated me since I met the man of my dreams

Life and style | The Guardian

Look at this from your daughter’s point of view, says Annalisa Barbieri. This must be hard enough for her to take in, without catching you in bed with him

I am 32 and have a 15-year-old daughter. It’s always been me and her. I’ve never brought home random guys, or even let her know I was talking to anyone. But last year, I met the man of my dreams. We dated a couple of months before I introduced them. Things were going OK (apart from a few bad days) until last week, that is, when she burst in on us in bed together and began screaming about how disgusting we were and how much she hates me.

We did end up talking, and I thought things were better. But today she came home unexpectedly and saw us lying naked together. We got into a screaming match and she wanted me to leave. So I did. I came back a few hours later. We tried to talk, but it didn’t go well. I am lost on what to do, and don’t know where to go from here.

Continue reading...

November 15th 2019, 10:33 am

It’s not enough to have a day off: you need others to share it with | Oliver Burkeman

Life and style | The Guardian

A society can’t flourish if its citizens can’t make a plan to meet for a beer

Ninety years ago this year, Joseph Stalin unveiled an ingenious new scheme to transform the Soviet Union into an industrial powerhouse: the end of the seven-day week. Much of the workforce switched to a four-day week, plus one day off – but they were divided into five cohorts, each resting on a different day, so factories could run without stopping. The propaganda, according to the historian Clive Foss, was that “workers would get more rest; production and employment would increase [and] leisure time would be more rationally employed, for cultural activities (theatre, clubs, sports) would no longer have to be crammed into a weekend, but could flourish every day, with their facilities far less crowded.”

It proved massively unpopular, though, not least because it made communal life impossible: families and friends with different rest days couldn’t coordinate social time together. (“That’s no holiday, if you have to celebrate by yourself,” one worker complained.) Stalin didn’t mind – undermining the centrality of the family was part of his plan, after all – but the new week didn’t boost production as planned, either, so it was phased out. Yet, as the writer Judith Shulevitz pointed out in the Atlantic recently, the social chaos of unsynchronised schedules has returned. It’s just that these days it’s imposed not by the state, but by unpredictable work patterns. Employees subject to “on-demand scheduling” and zero-hour contracts get the worst of it. Meanwhile, plenty of fancier jobs require staying late at short notice, or scrapping a weekend plan to plough through emails.

Continue reading...

November 15th 2019, 10:33 am

How to wear a big easy coat | Jess Cartner-Morley

Life and style | The Guardian

It works best when the supersized volume is offset by minimal styling – a neutral colour and not too much detailing

A coat that you love is the best fashion investment you can make. Your coat is what you put on as you leave the house on a cold morning. It is what stands between you and the outside world when the outside world is at its least friendly. A great party dress for a fun night out is the icing on a cake – but cake is delicious anyway. A great coat, on the other hand, is a cup of tea and a jaffa cake when you are cold and tired and hungry.

It goes without saying that practicality is paramount. But a great coat isn’t just a coat that keeps you warm, it’s a coat that makes you feel great. It is this that differentiates a great coat from a perfectly serviceable coat. The days when life feels a bit as though you are walking uphill into the wind are the days when you most need a reminder of the poetry to be found in a slice of blue sky, a free Pret coffee, or the comfort of a soft collar flipped up against the elements.

Continue reading...

November 15th 2019, 9:29 am

I don’t approve of my daughter’s girlfriend. Should I ban her from my house?

Life and style | The Guardian

She’s manipulative, flouts my house rules and has my daughter at her beck and call. Should I tell my daughter how I feel and risk damaging our relationship?

My 19-year-old daughter recently started her first serious relationship. She and her girlfriend are very intense and are together as much as possible. Initially, I liked her, but I’ve since seen another side to her. She’s manipulative, flouts my house rules, claims to have health issues and has my daughter running around after her. My daughter is very protective of her, blind to her behaviour and argues with me if I raise the broken house rules. I don’t want her girlfriend in my house but I’m worried that if I tell my daughter how I feel, and how dysfunctional her relationship is, I’ll alienate her.

• When leaving a message on this page, please be sensitive to the fact that you are responding to a real person in the grip of a real-life dilemma, who wrote to Private Lives asking for help, and may well view your comments here. Please consider especially how your words or the tone of your message could be perceived by someone in this situation, and be aware that comments that appear to be disruptive or disrespectful to the individual concerned will be removed.

Continue reading...

November 15th 2019, 7:28 am

Experience: I was arrested by a Swat team by mistake

Life and style | The Guardian

The officer helped me into my underpants, handcuffed and at gunpoint

We were a small group of actors, on our way to perform at a corporate press launch for a Fujitsu printer. I’d written something for them a year before in the style of It Ain’t Half Hot Mum – four actors camping it up as military officers – and they loved it. This time, they wanted me to ramp up the drama. On their advice, I rented two fake SA80 assault rifles, black balaclavas, full camo flak jackets and boots for the four of us. It was the late 90s – more innocent times, when it was easy enough to rent imitation firearms.

I was 23 at the time. I’d been a successful child actor on television and then moved into corporate entertainment. I was full of confidence; this was just another gig. The client had booked us to stay overnight at the Danebury Arms in Andover, a military town in Hampshire. We decided to bring the guns in from the car as we were worried about theft.

Continue reading...

November 15th 2019, 7:28 am

My life in sex: the man who can’t finish

Life and style | The Guardian

I often lose my erection due to the stress of knowing I won’t orgasm

I envy men who have premature ejaculation: at least they can finish. I’ve always had difficulty ejaculating during sex; when I lost my virginity, my partner didn’t believe it was my first time because I lasted so long. The problem has only got worse as I’ve got older, and these days, I often lose my erection after about 10 minutes due to the stress of knowing I won’t orgasm. In my whole life, I’ve only had sex five or six times without this being an issue.

At 35, I discovered the term traumatic masturbatory syndrome online. I think this is at the root of my problems; my early experiments with masturbation may have reduced the nerve function in my penis. I also worry that my 5in penis is smaller than average. My first girlfriend told me it was inadequate, and in my 20s, another girlfriend laughed about it in front of several mutual friends at a party.

Continue reading...

November 15th 2019, 7:28 am

Chekhov and Georgia O'Keeffe loved autumn leaves, and so do I | Hannah Jane Parkinson

Life and style | The Guardian

Their colour provides solace as we struggle to adjust from summer to darker nights and rain

The colours of autumn are abundant: the cool blue of the sky, the silver frost on the grass, the fuchsia of an early sunset. But the true riches are the leaves. The deep reds; the fierce oranges. The ochre of those curled at the edges. The shrivelled ones; the pale yellow of fading bruises. The combination of these colours against those crisp skies is majestic.

While the adjustment from summer to autumn can be tough – the reacquaintance with relentless rain and walking home from work in darkness – the colours are a solace. Walking around parks in October conjures Vincent Van Gogh’s Autumn Landscape With Four Trees (1885); the sienna, veiny delights of Georgia O’Keeffe’s Autumn Leaves (1924); Gustav Klimt’s Birch Forest I (1902). But best of all, David Hockney’s huge studies of Woldgate Woods (2006).

Continue reading...

November 15th 2019, 5:44 am

Bag it up: the 10 best totes – in pictures

Life and style | The Guardian

Practical and kinder to the planet if reused again and again, there’s a totes amaze bag here to suit every taste

Continue reading...

November 15th 2019, 4:26 am

From designer dogs to face masks: this week’s fashion trends

Life and style | The Guardian

What’s hot and what’s not in fashion this week

Designer dogs “Belly rubs are modern couture”, according to @dogsinrick, an Instagram account dedicated to pooches wearing Rick Owens.

Continue reading...

November 15th 2019, 2:27 am

The best winter dresses for all ages – in pictures

Life and style | The Guardian

If effortless winter dressing is at the top of your sartorial wishlist, invest in a long-sleeved dress, whether wrapped, shirt style or a simple tunic. Layer over a polo neck or style with knee-high boots

Continue reading...

November 15th 2019, 2:27 am

Friends reunited: the one where they try to get along again

Life and style | The Guardian

It’s been 15 years since the gang were all together and there’s a lot for the stars to discuss. So how’s it going?

SCENE: Central Perk coffee shop, and the gang is all there.

Chandler: Wow, could this BE any more unlikely? Us getting back together for a reunion?

Continue reading...

November 14th 2019, 12:42 pm

Never too small: the aspiration and nauseation of micro-apartments

Life and style | The Guardian

A hit Australian YouTube show presents a vision of our housing future that’s both charming and off-putting

It’s hard to explain the exact appeal of Never Too Small. The YouTube series takes viewers on meditative tours of tiny homes from across the world. Yes the spaces are beautiful and the design innovative, but there’s a curdle in the architectural cream. The residences, which range from 22 to 40 square meters in size, are a curious mix of aspirational and off-putting. Part of you wants to live in these dreamy matchboxes, another wonders how anyone could.

Never Too Small began as a pet project for director and design fan Colin Chee, a way to engage with the architects he admired. It only took four episodes to realise he was on to something. With views growing daily, his employer – Melbourne-based production company NewMac – encouraged him to develop the series. Two years later the channel has drawn a huge following, boasting over 700,000 subscribers, with videos regularly bringing in millions of views.

Continue reading...

November 14th 2019, 12:12 pm

Sleep apnoea means I feel tired all the time. Is this terrifying mask the only answer?

Life and style | The Guardian

It took fellow snorer Dom Joly to convince me of my condition and the benefits of treatment. But after sleeping serenely, I tear off the contraption and go back to my troubled slumber

I read somewhere of a handy acronym GPs often use. Tatt: tired all the time. And I’ve been extremely Tatt for a while now. I just thought it was the way of things, what with getting older. I never feel as if I sleep particularly well, but rarely do I lie awake all night, either.

But then a couple of months ago my night-time antics were described to me thus: “First there’s lots of snoring, then it’s like you can’t get your breath, and you’re struggling, gasping and grunting. And then your body seems to go into a sort of spasm, quite violent (especially hands), then you finally take a big desperate breath which is very loud, and everything shudders.” An attractive picture, I’m sure you’ll agree.

Continue reading...

November 14th 2019, 11:27 am

Homemade Christmas baking is a joy – even if it is not to your taste

Life and style | The Guardian

The aroma and satisfaction you get from being well-prepared for the big day is enough encouragement to make your own cakes and puddings. But don’t skimp on the brandy

I like to make my own Christmas puddings and cakes because the smell alone makes me feel psychologically prepared for the forthcoming festivities. It’s a bit of a ball ache, to be honest, and I’ve tried to replicate the smell with candles – but for some reason, the scent doesn’t seem particularly edible.

That said, I don’t really like eating any of this stuff. I don’t like the heaviness of the cake, the booziness of the pudding or the crushing disappointment when you bite into a delicious mince pie and find it full of mincemeat. But on the other hand, if you take the sense of plenty you get from having two full, two-litre puddings on your shelf; add in the self-righteousness of a cake that is mostly made six weeks before you need it, rather than half an hour; and spend a second ruminating on what a great host you are, you understand why you might have given several full days of your life over to making this stuff, without ever feeling moved to put it in your mouth.

Continue reading...

November 14th 2019, 7:55 am

How a video game helped me reclaim my body after having a baby

Life and style | The Guardian

Pregnancy, birth and looking after your child put a huge strain on your body – Nintendo’s Ring Fit can help you reclaim it

While celebrities and Instagram influencers seem able to shed their pregnancy weight within a few months (while cheerfully chronicling the process on an hourly basis) the reality is quite different for most women. I didn’t bounce back, I sort of crawled, and it’s hard not to feel at a loss when you’re so tired even looking at your trainers feels like work.

Between the lack of sleep and having to recover from one of the most physically demanding experiences the human body can go through, just leaving the house is an achievement in itself, let alone exercising. While the NHS recommends waiting until after your six-week postnatal check before doing anything strenuous (longer if you’ve had a caesarean or complicated delivery), experts also recommend regular activity to keep you fit, help your body recover and possibly prevent postnatal depression.

Continue reading...

November 14th 2019, 7:55 am

You know civilisation is on its last legs when a KitKat can cost £25

Life and style | The Guardian

As Christmas approaches, food firms are wheeling out ridiculous symbols of excess. It’s not a bit of fun – it’s conspicuous consumption gone mad

There is no more deathly phrase in the world of food than “it’s just a bit of fun”. Something being just a bit of fun is what leads from the gateway drug of a steak served on a slate so that cutting up your dinner sounds like fingernails being dragged down a blackboard, to a full English breakfast served in a dog food bowl, to a spare rib selection presented in a mini galvanised dustbin.

Just a bit of fun is the excuse for a record-breaking hamburger weighing more than a tonne which no one wants to eat; for a $169 hot dog topped with caviar and truffles which sounds disgusting; for a £130 wagyu sandwich, which really isn’t all that. It’s not fun. It’s seriously bloody annoying. What’s more it may well be a harbinger for the end of everything we hold dear. And as Christmas 2019 approaches, the volume of this nightmarish stuff is only increasing.

Continue reading...

November 14th 2019, 7:55 am

Before I die: a day with the terminally ill – video

Life and style | The Guardian

What does it feel like to know you’re dying? In episode two of Death Land, Leah Green meets people who are facing up to the end of their lives. She follows palliative care doctor Sunita Puri as she helps her patients come to terms with their own mortality

Dr Sunita Puri’s book, That Good Night: Life and Medicine in the Eleventh Hour, is available to buy here

Continue reading...

November 14th 2019, 7:55 am

Pickle juice and Marmite: the 11 best hangover cures – by pub landlords

Life and style | The Guardian

They serve up the hangovers in the first place, but what do they recommend to take them away?

As party season approaches, so does the likelihood of waking up with a hangover – unless you don’t drink, or you are one of those elegant types who can decline an offer of more wine without yelping: “Oh, go on then!” a millisecond later.

Obviously, we’re still waiting for science to come up with a cure. Some swear by food or drink to sort themselves out. But which is best? We asked people who work with booze, from pub landlords to sommeliers.

Continue reading...

November 14th 2019, 7:55 am

The rise of the VSCO girl – and how to spot one

Life and style | The Guardian

They wear oversized T-shirts, scrunchies and ugly shoes and have a language all their own

This week, the New York Times published an article advising on what to do when your tween wants to be part of the “VSCO girl” trend – a sure sign that parents have cottoned on, and the trend will be “ovah” by Christmas. Until then, here is what you need to know:

Continue reading...

November 14th 2019, 7:11 am

‘I’m 53 and my face finally makes sense’: how I learned to stop worrying and age gracefully

Life and style | The Guardian

When you reach 50, beauty is about caring for what you have, not mourning what you don’t, argues Bibi Lynch

I didn’t know how I’d age. I had no idea what my face and skin would do. Most women glimpse that future in their mother’s face. But my mum died when she was 40, so I never saw her face – our face – age. What I did see, though, was my mum, twice a day, stand in front of the bathroom mirror and place a dot of white cream on her forehead, on her nose, on her chin, on her cheeks, and one dollop on the tip of my nose and rub the moisturiser in. Another guiding light came in the form of Jackie magazine. It instructed me on the twice-a-day cleanse, tone and moisturise routine, and it’s the only religion I’ve ever had. Since those days, I’ve gained the deepest lines around my eyes when I laugh. But that means I’ve laughed. My once-teenage smattering of cheek freckles has taken over my entire visage too. But that means the sun has kissed me over and over, the insatiable thing.

I’m 53, and my face finally makes sense. Is it bad to say I sort of like my face? Sort of like it very much? Not that it’s perfect, of course; mine is a nose only a parent could love (and not necessarily unconditionally). But I really do like it. And more so as I get older. I think my face is sort of beautiful. Not because the features are beautiful – don’t make me mention my jowls – but because there’s a beauty in ageing. We all know about the glow of youth, of course, but there’s an easy, radiating warmth in maturity that’s unmissable, too.

Continue reading...

November 14th 2019, 6:40 am

Sexting: do men and women do it differently?

Life and style | The Guardian

When you think of sexting, you usually think of men sending unsolicited pictures. But what about the relationships that thrive on it – and the women who love it?

Madeleine Holden has three simple tips for taking a good dick pic. First, zoom out. Second, clear the background of clutter. Third, experiment with angles. Then, for extra credit, consider tone, narrative, aesthetics and the desires of the recipient. “It was always those that elevated a dick pic from – to use my scale – a C- to an A+.”

As founder of Critique My Dick Pic, a popular Tumblr blog that ran for five years from 2013, Holden wrote thoughtful reviews of photographs of about 500 strangers’ genitals, from almost 10,000 submissions. (It was brought to an end in December last year by Tumblr’s ban on explicit visual content, a move widely decried as a blow to the diversity of sexual imagery online.)

Continue reading...

November 14th 2019, 5:24 am

The ecstatic rise of rainbow hair: ‘I have one life. I’m going to live it colourfully!’

Life and style | The Guardian

In a world laid low by Brexit, you see them at school gates and in supermarket queues: ordinary women with wildly multicoloured hair. We ask five colour converts why they have taken the leap

We are facing the prospect of a few gloomy grey months ahead, with a general election on the horizon, and no end to the Brexit impasse in sight. But one trend has emerged to brighten up these damp winter days.

Not long ago you would see rainbow hair only on celebrities such as Katy Perry or Nicki Minaj, or people in the cosplay community. Not any more. What was once a wacky trend is now beloved of ordinary women. Look around your local coffee shop, or observe mothers on the school run, and you may see the rainbow hair trend for yourself. It’s certainly hard to miss.

Continue reading...

November 14th 2019, 1:03 am

Fat cats: how to get a lazy, obese feline into perfect shape

Life and style | The Guardian

Pet obesity is a growing problem. Here’s the best way to address any unwelcome kitty weight gain

When the morbidly obese cat Cinderblock embarked on a weightloss journey two weeks ago, her one-paw-on-the-treadmill efforts to get trim went viral. Since the launch of her Cinder Gets Fit YouTube channel, she has gained 16,000 subscribers and dropped 0.2lb, thanks to her strict diet and exercise regimen. Pet obesity is a growing concern among vets in the UK and is linked to health conditions such as arthritis, diabetes and heart disease. A survey of 2,100 pet owners by Direct Line pet insurance found that, in the past year, more than a million cat owners have been told by vets that their pets are overweight. Now, I have tried to get my cat to exercise more, but if I leave him outside for the day, he does much the same as he would do indoors – sleeps. Cats are notoriously lazy, so what can we do to help them effectively lose weight?

Continue reading...

November 13th 2019, 1:14 pm

The female problem: how male bias in medical trials ruined women's health

Life and style | The Guardian

Centuries of female exclusion has meant women’s diseases are often missed, misdiagnosed or remain a total mystery

From the earliest days of medicine, women have been considered inferior versions of men. In On the Generation of Animals, the Greek philosopher Aristotle characterised a female as a mutilated male, and this belief has persisted in western medical culture.

“For much of documented history, women have been excluded from medical and science knowledge production, so essentially we’ve ended up with a healthcare system, among other things in society, that has been made by men for men,” Dr Kate Young, a public health researcher at Monash University in Australia, tells me.

Continue reading...

November 13th 2019, 12:24 pm

Carbon cafe: what is the most sustainable coffee order?

Life and style | The Guardian

From the beans to the milk to the way it’s brewed, the environmental impact of your daily pick-me-up can vary widely

If you stroll through any Australian city during morning rush hour, you’ll find the sidewalks teeming with people inhaling the savoury, bittersweet aromas of their early morning coffee, zinging to life as the caffeine hits their circulation. In fact, Australians drink more than 16m coffees every day, supporting a $10bn industry in this country alone.

But while the caffeine hit is relatively short-lived, the environmental impacts linger.

Continue reading...

November 13th 2019, 12:24 pm

Kim-Joy’s recipe for tangzhong hedgehog monkey bread

Life and style | The Guardian

This looks like a woodland floor – the perfect environment for little hedgehogs

Monkey bread is the perfect sharing bread, and you will want to keep tearing off these spiced and buttery pillows. You will need a bundt tin, as the hole in the centre means that the enriched dough cooks evenly, and the nonstick coating will help the bread slide out easily at the end.

Serves: 12

Continue reading...

November 13th 2019, 11:55 am

The vegan revolution: why the latest 'meat' is made entirely from thin air

Life and style | The Guardian

A US startup claims it can convert CO2 into nutrients. Could innovations such as this and 3D-printed steaks provide a sustainable food future?

In a feat that has biblical overtones, a California startup claims to have developed a technology that can create “meat” from thin air. Is this latest artificial meat product the ultimate solution to the environmental catastrophe the world’s growing meat consumption poses, or a pipe dream that will never make it beyond the lab?

The air-based “meat” comes from a company called Air Protein and is based on an idea conceived by Nasa in the 1960s as a possible way to feed astronauts in space. The basic concept is that CO2 breathed out by astronauts could be converted into nutrients by microorganisms called hydrogenotrophs.

Continue reading...

November 13th 2019, 11:55 am

How to cook saag paneer - recipe | Felicity Cloake’s masterclass

Life and style | The Guardian

The Indian restaurant classic spinach-and-curd-cheese side dish gets the Felicity Cloake treatment

Saag paneer has long been my go-to side dish in Indian restaurants, but having managed to recreate the magic of these deliciously oily, garlicky greens dotted with plump pillows of fresh curd cheese, these days I increasingly find myself eating it at home with nothing more than a warm flatbread for company. (Note: to make this vegan, use extra-firm tofu instead of the paneer.)

Prep 15 min, plus draining time
Cook 10 min
Serves 4 as a side

Continue reading...

November 13th 2019, 11:55 am

Feminism is now used to sell almost everything - even breast implants | Yomi Adegoke

Life and style | The Guardian

Body positivity, inclusivity and empowerment have been co-opted by the beauty and clothing industry to flog us yet more unnecessary products

Since feminism and body positivity has been appropriated by big brands to sell us more stuff, we have seen the “Dovification” of beauty and clothing campaigns. It is a trend that has led to a spike in what I am going to call oxymoronic advertising: companies boasting of body-positive shapewear, feminist high heels and empowering lingerie. The recent MYA cosmetic surgery advert is the logical outcome of this shift toward shoppable feminism.

The company’s latest “Every Body” advert would score full points in a game of “every advert aimed at women in 2019” bingo. There’s the real woman’s first steps into fitness: here it is a weightlifter, focused on being “strong instead of skinny”. Then there is the archetypal millennial, complete with tattoos and candyfloss hair. And, of course, the obligatory ethnic-minority woman. All are embracing their insecurities, within the limits that still allow MYA to peddle surgical fixes for all these things. The real kicker is when it is declared that “Sherrifa is a feminist and had a breast enlargement (you can do both)”. It feels as if MYA is trying to posit this as a political cause in itself.

Continue reading...

November 13th 2019, 11:55 am

Mulberry reports £11m losses despite efforts to win younger customers

Life and style | The Guardian

UK sales fall after department store discounts, but brand says growth in Asia has accelerated

Losses at the luxury British brand Mulberry have increased by a third after widespread discounting hit sales in the UK.

The handbag maker said pretax losses widened to £11m in the six months to 28 September from £8.2m a year before. Sales in the UK, which account for 65% of the business, fell 4% amid challenging conditions and subdued demand from shoppers.

Continue reading...

November 13th 2019, 11:08 am

Rise of the topknot: why big buns are everywhere

Life and style | The Guardian

From off-duty models to Instagram yogis, and Rihanna on the red carpet, the messy ’do is a celebrity and influencer staple. Of course you can blame the internet

How did a hairstyle that once signified “off to the garage for some milk” become a fashion phenomenon? Because that’s where we are at with the high bun – or topknot – a hairstyle that is popping up everywhere.

The ’do is fast becoming a red-carpet staple, seen on stars from Jennifer Lopez to Katy Perry to Rihanna. At the People’s Choice awards on Sunday, Zendaya wore an unstructured version, while her 16-year-old Euphoria co-star Storm Reid wore a towering bun topped with a star-shaped pin. Last month, when the British women’s team competed at the World Artistic Gymnastics championships in Stuttgart, all six wore the hairstyle.

Continue reading...

November 13th 2019, 7:19 am

‘I was on a high for a month’: how a student discovered an astonishing family connection

Life and style | The Guardian

While ill in bed, Ben Hammond passed the time by charting his family tree. Little did he know he had a lot more in common with his forefathers than just blood

When 21-year-old postgraduate student Ben Hammond was ill in bed for a few weeks, he needed something to occupy his mind. That something was tracing his family tree.

“My mum has always had an interest in family history,” he says. “But she just had a few bits and bobs of information written down. I thought I would go a bit further, because now there are the resources to do it.”

Continue reading...

November 13th 2019, 7:19 am

Mona Lisa suckling, a raffia tutu and one-sided kisses: Photo Vogue festival 2019 – in pictures

Life and style | The Guardian

This year’s Photo Vogue festival in Milan is divided into three: title show A Glitch in the System, tackling stereotypes; Fashion Moving Forward, an exploration of film in fashion; and Inez & Vinoodh: Hi-Lo Transformers, showcasing the duo’s work. Here are our highlights from all three

Continue reading...

November 13th 2019, 2:18 am

Is carbon neutrality the silver bullet fashion has been hoping for?

Life and style | The Guardian

The industry’s carbon footprint is under increasing scrutiny, but critics argue that offsetting lessens guilt rather than reducing harm

Tiny clutch bags, conceptual knitwear and carbon neutrality – the ideas that fashion chooses to embrace each season aren’t always those you might expect. But thanks to a recent shift, no doubt spurred on by the “Greta Thunberg effect”, carbon – as well as the practice of offsetting it – has become a hot topic for many of the biggest names in the fashion industry.

At New York fashion week in September, luxury fashion designer Gabriela Hearst staged fashion’s first carbon-neutral catwalk show. Hot on its heels, Gucci announced it would go carbon neutral with chief executive, Marco Bizzarri, stating that “the planet has gone too far”. Next up, luxury fashion conglomerate Kering, owner of big-name brands such as Saint Laurent, Balenciaga and Bottega Veneta, announced that its entire group would offset 2.4m tonnes of carbon dioxide in a bid to “become carbon-neutral within its own operations and across the entire supply chain.”

Continue reading...

November 12th 2019, 1:54 pm

My successful only son is miserable to me. Am I wrong to feel unappreciated?

Life and style | The Guardian

Being a parent plunges you into a sort of unrequited love, writes Eleanor Gordon-Smith, but that doesn’t mean you’re in the wrong

My only son is very successful. He owns five properties, is self-employed, and due to inherit from a family member soon. He buys top-brand watches and cars. But l feel he is quite miserable towards me, his hard-working mum. I’ve never had big bunch flowers from him or wee present off the cuff. Am l wrong? It upsets me to not be appreciated.


I heard a story not too long ago about a father talking to his daughter. She was on the edge of the decision about whether she would have children and he was talking to her about what he’d learned when he became a dad. He told her that if he had his time again he wasn’t sure he’d have children. He wasn’t being unkind; it wasn’t because he didn’t adore her. It was because he hadn’t understood the way that being a parent plunges you permanently into unrequited love. Your whole life and heart become structured around someone who won’t return your calls; you would take a bullet for someone who forgets your birthday.

Continue reading...

November 12th 2019, 12:51 pm

A right royal mistake: is the Queen the ultimate feminist? Absolutely not

Life and style | The Guardian

Olivia Colman has said that Her Majesty is feminist through and through – a shining example to other women. Here’s why her reasoning doesn’t stack up

For clarity, I love Olivia Colman, we love her (if I have read this memo correctly) as an organisation, and she is a feminist. She was accused of having a “leftwing face” by the Telegraph columnist Charles Moore. “What the hell is a leftwing face?” she retorted, rightly. She does, however, have a feminist face, by which I mean there is a lot going on in it.

However, her assertion this week that the Queen – whom she plays, following a cast change, in the new series of The Crown – is the “ultimate feminist”, is incorrect. The more Colman explains her reasoning in an interview with Radio Times, the more incorrect it becomes. “She’s the breadwinner, she’s the one on our coins and banknotes. Prince Philip has to walk behind her. She fixed cars in the second world war. She insisted on driving a king who came from a country where women weren’t allowed to drive [King Abdullah of Saudi Arabia, at Balmoral in 1998]. She’s no shrinking violet.”

Continue reading...

November 12th 2019, 11:35 am

McMadness: can a latte and doughnut really make you feel like a millionaire?

Life and style | The Guardian

McDonald’s workers are organising for better pay – just as the fast food chain launches a menu that claims to make you feel super-rich. Here’s the reality

It’s a big news week for McDonald’s. Just as the fast food outlet launched its festive Millionaire’s menu, some of its UK workers have organised a McStrike in protest against low wages and job insecurity. There is a certain irony in telling customers they can “Live like a millionaire” (that is the campaign slogan) as the people on the tills are being paid £8.80 an hour. I joined the queue to see if the Christmas coffee and doughnut live up to the outrage.

I took the lid off my Millionaire’s latte and was hit by something sticky that felt more solid than airborne. I had to peer into the cup to see it, though. The in-store poster featured a tall red cup with piped chocolate cream coiled well above the rim, a bit like the poo emoji, but mine had melted into the hot drink. Of course it had. (Did you know commercial food photographers use shaving cream to emulate whipped cream?)

Continue reading...

November 12th 2019, 10:48 am

New Look blames poor spending and weather for 7% drop in sales

Life and style | The Guardian

Fashion outlet still working on turnaround that closed 100 stores and slashed rents

New Look has blamed a steep fall in sales on weak consumer spending and mild autumn weather which knocked demand for its new winter clothing ranges.

New Look chief operating officer Nigel Oddy said the 7.4% drop in first half like-for-like sales reflected “ongoing consumer uncertainty and seasonal volatility”. Sales picked up over the summer months but fell back again in September due to the “unseasonably warm weather” which also affected demand at Next and Marks & Spencer stores.

Continue reading...

November 12th 2019, 10:05 am

Jane Seymour: ‘Not every designer will dress someone my age’

Life and style | The Guardian

The actor on sharing clothes with Donatella Versace and whether re-wearing outfits is acceptable

This dress was created for [the 1986 TV mini-series] Crossings, which was based on a Danielle Steel novel, but I also wore it to the People’s Choice awards in 1996. In those days, it was part of my contract that I was given all the costumes, so I had an amazing collection. Crossings was costumed by Nolan Miller, who was famous for designing the clothes for Dynasty. I was playing a very glamorous character and was going for that Rita Hayworth look. Around that time, actresses, instead of models, started showing off the fashion of the era. Unless you are a model, it’s not something you’re really equipped to do but, when you put a gown like that on, you become a character, even on the red carpet. You can’t come in like a church mouse.

Nolan became a personal friend of mine – he knew that I used to design and make all my own clothes, so we collaborated on my costumes. When I was younger I didn’t have any money so I’d buy good fabric from Liberty – the offcuts that nobody wanted – or I’d go to vintage stores, bring-and-buy sales or church sales, and turn them into outfits for myself.

Continue reading...

November 12th 2019, 8:17 am

Sea silk: the world's most exclusive textile is being auctioned this week

Life and style | The Guardian

The ultra-rare material made from fibers – byssus – harvested from giant mollusks was once the height of fashion, for items such as the hat going under the hammer in New York

On Wednesday, a curious item will be auctioned at Landmark on the Park on the Upper West Side.

At first glance there is little remarkable about lot 200, a turban style hat with a dark golden hue. On close inspection its threads appear similar to that of human or horse hair, but it is in fact woven of a silken fiber which will be unfamiliar to most New Yorkers.

Continue reading...

November 12th 2019, 7:17 am
Get it on Google Play تحميل تطبيق نبأ للآندرويد مجانا